No Internet Access When Connected (Affects Ethernet AND/OR Wi-Fi)

4.3 

No Internet Access When Connected

Some users may encounter an issue where they are unable to use the Internet even though they appear to be connected through either Wi-Fi or Ethernet. Restarting the computer will, in some cases, fix the problem temporarily. 

Update January 11, 2019 - With machines running Windows 10 1809, the fix detailed below may or may not resolve the issue. There seems to be a completely different issue with 1809, which is a bug that Microsoft has yet to address. You can find out which version of Windows 10 that you are running by clicking Start, then type winver and press Enter. You will see "Version" followed by your Windows 10 version number. If you are using Windows 10 1809, the only potential fixes, at this time, seem to be enabling IPV6, and setting your network connection to "Public" instead of "Private." This a Windows 10 issue and not an issue with any specific network adapter or brand. You can find information about the issue, as well as Microsoft's suggested fixes, by clicking here. Although Microsoft Store applications are specifically mentioned, most users that experience this problem are experiencing it with multiple applications from multiple sources. 

If your Windows version is 1803 or earlier, the below fix will often resolve it for you. It may also resolve the issue on some Windows 10 1809 machines, but that seems to be more hit-or-miss.

This has been confirmed to be an issue with Windows 10 which has surfaced with recent updates. These recent updates have removed entries from the Windows 10 registry which instructed the operating system to release used ports when all ports are exhausted. This has the effect of being connected to an Internet connection without the operating system having the ability to open new ports. Applications and services which were already connected may still continue to function, while the user will be unable to browse the Internet, or connect to anything else. 

We have confirmed that this can be resolved by replacing these registry entries. Here is a step-by-step guide:

  1. Click Start
  2. Type regedit and press Enter
  3. Click File > Export... and then save the file to a place you will remember. This is your backup. If anything goes wrong, you can double-click this file from your machine and it will restore your current registry settings. The export may take a moment.
  4. Once the export is finished, copy this line - HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters - and paste it into the white space directly below File - Edit - etc, and press Enter. This should navigate you to the correct location in the registry, as seen below (right-click on the image and open image in new tab to expand):
    Ports Registry Fix
    Ports Registry Fix
  5. With Parameters remaining highlighted on the left side, right-click the empty white space on the right and click New > DWORD
  6. Name it TcpTimedWaitDelay and press Enter.
  7. Double-click TcpTimedWaitDelay and change the Value to 0000001e. Leave the Base setting as Hex. It should look like the below screenshot.
    Ports Registry Fix Entry
    Ports Registry Fix Entry
  8. Click OK.
  9. Repeat steps 5-8, creating the following keys - 

    MaxUserPort 
    REG_DWORD: 0000fffe (hex)

    TcpNumConnections 
    REG_DWORD: 00fffffe (hex) 

    TcpMaxDataRetransmissions 
    REG_DWORD: 00000005 (hex)
  10. Click File > Exit
  11. Restart by clicking Start > Power > Restart and test.

Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

4.3 

Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

Some users have contacted us regarding their Killer Networking adapters not working after a Windows Update. This has affected various adapters, including the 1525, 1535, and 1550. Although we are as yet unsure exactly which update is causing this issue, there seems to be a connection with specific machine manufacturers having pushed an outdated version of the Killer Control Center through Windows Update, along with extremely outdated wireless drivers, which leads to a corrupted device driver.

The following troubleshooting steps should allow you to resolve the issue. 

  1. If your machine has Internet access through Ethernet, or if you are able to move files onto the machine using a USB thumb drive or some other medium, clean installing to the most recent version of the Killer Control Center and device drivers is the best way to resolve this issue. Click here for the guide on clean installing the latest Killer Control Center and device drivers. 
  2. (Code 10) If the clean install does not solve the issue, try manually installing the latest device drivers for your Killer Wireless device. This will hopefully replace the corrupted device driver. Click here for the guide to manually install drivers in Device Manager.
  3. If manually installing the driver does not resolve the issue, or if the network adapter is not present in Device Manager, try clean installing the drivers in Device Manager. This is different than clean installing the Killer Control Center or simply manually installing the drivers in Device Manager. This will hopefully remove the corrupted driver from the Windows Driver Store, allowing you to update to a working driver. Click here for our guide on clean installing drivers in Device Manager.
  4. If none of the above resolves the issue, then the issue may be due to something that is not strictly related to your wireless adapter or drivers, but is causing the adapter to malfunction. Check the support downloads page for your machine or motherboard manufacturer and make sure that you have the latest BIOS available, as well as the latest chipset drivers available. 
  5. If none of the above resolves your issue, you may need to uninstall whatever update caused the issue. Click here for our guide on uninstalling Windows Updates. Please note that this guide only refers to Microsoft Windows Updates specifically. It's possible that the update that caused the issue was not an update to Microsoft Windows, but an update to something else on your system. Keep that in mind if you find yourself manually uninstalling recent updates, which is otherwise covered in the linked guide. 
  6. If you have followed every step in this guide and still have not been able to establish wireless connectivity, try discharging your machine to reset the CMOS. Click here for our guide on discharging your machine. 
  7. If none of the above resolved the issue, then you may need to resort to resetting Windows. This may result in lost files and applications, so restoring a backup is preferable, if you have one available. Click here for Microsoft's information on resetting Windows and click "Reset your PC." Please be sure to read exactly what the reset will entail. Alternatively, you may find that other options on that page may better fit your needs. If you do go this route, make sure you install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers as soon as Windows updates to 1803 or later, before other updates can take place. This is best done using our clean install guide (click here). To find out which version of Windows is currently installed, click Start, type winver, and press Enter. Refer to the "Version" number. When resetting  your PC or reinstalling Windows, this number may change as Windows updates. As soon as the build is 1803 or newer, install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers using the clean install guide. 
  8. Unfortunately, if none of the above resolves your issue, your next step will be to contact your machine or motherboard manufacturer for RMA or repair options. When a wireless network adapter's driver is updated, the firmware on the chip is flashed. If none of the above solved the problem, then this indicates that the adapter is no longer capable of accepting a flash, and will need to be replaced. Alternatively, the machine or motherboard manufacturer may have an unpublished BIOS update or chipset driver that can resolve the issue. 

Windows Update Slowed Or Broke Internet Connectivity

 

Windows Update Slowed Or Broke Internet Connectivity

Update September 15 2018 - Windows 10 1809, which is currently being released in October 2018, seems to have caused many of these issues since its release. If you are unable to resolve this issue by following this knowledge base article, you may need to revert your operating system back to the Windows 10 1803 to restore functionality. While we do not yet have a guide for this, there are quite a few around the web, such as this excellent guide for rolling back to Windows 10 1803. 

Windows users will periodically run into situations where a Windows Update either slows or completely removes their ability to connect to the Internet. This is usually due to some component of the updated operating system not functioning well with older drivers, though sometimes Windows Updates have been known to just break things for no reason. In the past, Microsoft has even recalled some updates. Whatever the reason, if you know that your machine was working well before the Windows Update, the best way to restore functionality is often to remove that Windows Update. There are a few ways to do this.

First, you should check Device Manager and make sure it's not a simple error. To do that, right-click Start, click Device Manager, then double-click Network Adapters and look for your network adapter, be it a wireless adapter or an Ethernet adapter. If you find your network adapter, and it has a Code 10 error on it, then click here for a guide to manually install a driver for the device. If that's not the issue, or if that doesn't fix it, read on.

Try System Restore First

This is the fastest, easiest way to get your system back in working order, when it's available, and when it works. Luckily, if it doesn't work, it won't do anything at all. Here are the steps:

  1. Temporarily uninstall any third party antivirus application as these will almost universally prevent System Restore from restoring properly, resulting in an error. 
  2. Click Start
  3. Type system restore and click Create a Restore Point (don't worry, you're not doing that, that's just what comes up)
  4. Click the System Restore button.
  5. Check the "Recommended restore" option to make sure the date is very close to when the Windows Update happened, but still before it happened. If so, click Next.  If not, you can click "Choose a different restore point," but those will usually be earlier dates, if any. 
  6. There may be another confirmation prompt or two, depending on your build of Windows, but after that, System Restore should do its thing. This can take a while, so be patient. 

Uninstall The Windows Update

  1. If the System Restore doesn't work or isn't available, you will need to uninstall the Windows Update. This works surprisingly well and generally does not have many drawbacks, though making a back-up is definitely recommended. After you make your backup, you will want to set a System Restore point, as they are much faster and easier to use than restoring a backup, if necessary. Creating a System Restore point is similar to using one:
    1. Click Start
    2. Type system restore and click Create a Restore Point
    3. Check to make sure your system disk, probably (C:), has Protection "On". If not, click it Configure, and click Turn on System Protection, move the slider until it's using around 5% - 10%, then click Apply > OK. 
    4. Click Create
    5. Name it something you'll remember, like "Uninstalling Windows Updates." It will append the date, so you'll also have that information. Click Create and give it some time to finish.
    6. Once it is finished, close the "System Properties" window that opened when you searched for System Restore.
  2. Now to uninstall that update. This is surprisingly easy when you know where to look. Click Start, and type Windows Update.
  3. Click Windows Update Settings
  4. Click View Update History
  5. Click Uninstall Updates
  6. Click the Installed On column header to sort by the Installed On date until the newest updates are at the top. 
  7. This part is important. Even though you sorted by newest updates, you're probably still not looking at updates for Microsoft Windows. Instead, you're probably looking at updates for Microsoft Office, or Microsoft Visual C++, or possibly some other Microsoft product that you didn't even know you had. You can tell because, just under "Name", it will list the name of the application with no other information to its right. Scroll until you find Microsoft Windows, and you will have found the updates that we're looking for.
  8. You will want to uninstall any update that took place between now and when your machine last worked normally. To do that, click the update, and click Uninstall, which will hopefully appear beside "Organize" at the top of the columns. If the option to uninstall does not appear, this means that you cannot uninstall that update and keep your operating system intact. The same goes for updates that are not listed. 
  9. If you are unable to uninstall the update, you may have to resort to restoring a backup or, if that's not possible, resetting Windows. Click here for Microsoft's article on resetting Windows. However, if the only issue that you are having is with your Killer products, please reach out to us first at killersupport@rivetnetworks.com so that we can see if we can help you out. 

Update Your Drivers As Soon As You Have Internet Access!

As soon as you are able to restore Internet access, be it with a System Restore, a backup restore, or uninstalling the Windows Update, make sure you update your drivers! This should prevent the issue from happening when Windows Update invariably installs the same update again in the future. You can find our driver downloads here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/ - and if you have any issues installing the latest Killer Control Center and device drivers, we suggest using our clean install method here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center.

Where Can I Buy Killer Networking Adapters?

3.8 

Where Can I Buy A Killer Networking Adapter?

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is currently available for sale here on Amazon. This is the only networking adapter that we currently offer for sale as an individual product. 

This is an M.2 Wi-Fi solution, and is the only Killer Networking adapter that is officially for sale individually. It uses IPEX -MHF4 antenna receptacles, which are commonly found on M.2 Wi-Fi adapters. Physically, it is a direct swap for the Killer Wireless-AC 1435, 1525, and 1535, as well as numerous Intel adapters. However, before ordering and attempting to install, we suggest you verify the following:

At this time, the adapter only ships to the United States. We are currently working toward shipping to the United Kingdom, but do not have a current timeframe. There are also other resellers that are also reselling the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, often to International buyers. 

Unfortunately, our current line of Ethernet adapters are currently only integrated into motherboards and laptops of various manufacturers and not sold as individual units. This is due to different regulatory and system calibration requirements. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are interested in buying or building a computer with our Ethernet or Wireless built in, here are the brands to look for:

Machine manufacturers that use our adapters include: Alienware, ASRock, Clevo, Dell, Gigabyte, Lenovo, Sager, MSI, and Razer, and some smaller companies like HIDevolution, who takes others brands and customizes them.

Motherboard manufacturers that use our adapters include: ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI.

If you are looking for our tech, make sure you check which network adapters are being used, as these manufacturers do not all exclusively use our network adapters. You may have to look at various models.

You may find that our other wireless adapters do show up online for sale from time to time. These are not authorized for resale by us, or any authorized manufacturer, but are being sold as components removed from other machines. Be sure to keep that in mind when purchasing. We can only support adapters that are obtained in this fashion in a very limited capacity.

Also note that many laptop manufacturers use hardware IDs to lock out non-authorized Wi-Fi adapters, so swapping in another adapter may not be as simple as it seems. Be sure to check with your machine's technical support or documentation before buying a different adapter.

 

How to Update or Install The Killer Control Center

3.0 

Updating or Installing The Killer Control Center

The Killer Control Center installers contain drivers for the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500. The Killer Control Center can be installed on any system with one, or multiples of these network adapters.

Only the non-UWD version of the Killer Control Center that is downloaded from our website is compatible with our Wireless-N adapters - the Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103.

 The Killer Control Center cannot be installed on machines with the E2100, Xeno Pro, 2100, M1, or K1. These are legacy devices that are no longer supported, and no longer receive driver updates. 

The first step in updating or installing the Killer Control Center is download the correct installer package. There are currently two different Killer Control Center installers:

Choosing the Correct Installer

Those using a Killer Wireless-N adapter, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and any older build of Windows 10 prior to 1803 (April 2018 Update) should use our website installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64

Those using Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update) or later should use the UWD installer, as long as they are not using a Wireless-N adapter - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd

Please note that the UWD installer is fully compatible with the E2200, E2400, E2500, Killer Wireless-AC 1525, 1435, 1535, 1550, and 1550i adapters, as well as all of our forthcoming adapters in 2018 and beyond.

Wireless xTend, a new feature of ours, is only compatible with the 1550, and will only appear if you use the UWD installer and have a 1550 installed.

If you are using Windows 10, and you are unsure which version you are running, you can find out by clicking Start, then typing winver and pressing Enter. A box will appear, which will give you information about Windows, including the version number. 

For more details on the differences between the two packages, please see this article - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/100-which-killer-control-center-should-i-install

Once you know which version to download, and have downloaded it, double-click the installer to install both the latest drivers for your Killer devices, and the latest version of the Killer Control Center. 

If all goes well, you can stop here. 

Errors or Other Issues When Installing

If you encounter any errors or problems when installing, first try uninstalling all versions of the Killer Software that are currently on your machine. We have developed a tool to make this very simple. Please follow the steps below:

  1. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe (please note that this is not the old Killer Remover tool - this is much more comprehensive)
  2. Make sure you have the installer for the Killer Control Center that you will be installing. Return here if you aren't sure. 
  3. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. There are two buttons - one for scanning, one for uninstalling. You do not have to scan. The scan might not find any software installations, but there may still be services installed on your machine that are preventing the installation of the current suite. Regardless of what the scan says, if you are having issues installing, make sure you click Remove Killer Software. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED"
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has completed restarting, run the installer for the Killer Control Center. 

If you are still unable to install the Killer Control Center, please try using Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed. You can find our guide for using this tool here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/90-microsoft-tool. This tool is very effective because, if you are still having problems by this point, the issue is very likely caused by files that have been shuffled around during a Windows Update. 

If the Microsoft Tool does not solve the issue, please submit a ticket to our support, along with an install log for us to analyze, by following these steps:

  1. Run the installer for the Killer Control Center one more time, so as to create the most recent possible information in the install log.
  2. After the installer fails, access your TEMP folder by clicking Start, then typing %TEMP%, then pressing Enter.
  3. Arrange the files in that folder by "Date Modified" so that the most recently modified files are at the top.
  4. You will see many files. Find the most recent file that begins with MSI and ends with .LOG. Move or copy that file to a place you will remember.
  5. Click Support > Contact Support at the top of our website, and be sure to click the folder and attach that .LOG file. In your ticket, please also mention any errors that you might have seen when attempting to install the Killer Control Center. 

Will the Killer 1550 Work In My Desktop Mainboard?

 

Some users have inquired whether the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is compatible with their desktop mainboards. 

Most desktop mainboard M.2 slots are keyed for storage, not for Wi-Fi. You will need to refer to the manufacturer of your specific mainboard, but unless there was a Wi-Fi adapter pre-installed in the mainboard, the M.2 slot is very likely keyed for storage. In such cases, no Wi-Fi adapter will work in that slot.

We have also received questions regarding using the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 in M.2 to PCI-E converters. Although these types of converters usually work well enough, we have noted that the 1550 sometimes does not work in converters that work well with other adapters. This seems to be tied more to the age of the computer than anything to do with the converters, but we have not yet narrowed down any specifics, so we cannot say for sure what will and will not work in this capacity. 

For more frequently asked questions about the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, please see the full FAQ here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/87-questions-about-the-killer-wireless-ac-1550

Installing the Killer 1550 with an M.2 to PCI-E Converter

 

Installing the Killer 1550 with an M.2 to PCI-E Converter

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 can be used in some M.2 to PCI-E converters, allowing desktop machines with open PCI-E slots to use the adapter, provided the following conditions are met.

  • The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 can only be used in PCI-E 1x or PCI-E 4x slots. It cannot be used in the longer PCI-E 8x or PCI-E 16x slots. Using an incorrect PCI-E slot can cause the 1550 to either not appear in Device Manager, or to appear in Device Manager with an error, or a bang symbol.
    pcie
  • In our testing, we have noted that converters often do not produce working results when the converter is plugged into a northbridge slot. We advise that you use your converter in a southbridge slot. Although you will need to reference the technical specifications for your motherboard to know exactly which slot corresponds with which bridge, southbridge slots are generally those beneath the dedicate graphics slot on a desktop motherboard when the motherboard is installed in a tower case. 
  • For Bluetooth, a USB cable must be run between a USB 2.0 header on the motherboard and the USB header on the converter. If this is not connected, Bluetooth will not appear in Device Manager at all, and will not be usable. 
  • We cannot recommend any specific PCI-E converters. These are usually available from various vendors on Amazon, and most of them seem to work well, but they are typically unbranded, so buy at your own risk.
  • Please note that the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is only compatible with Windows 10.

Internet Problems With New Computers With Killer 1550

4.3 

Internet Problems With New Computers With Killer 1550

Some users may encounter issues with new computers with the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 installed. These issues can usually be resolved by clean-installing to the latest Killer Control Center. You can find the guide for this here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center.

If you are unable to download the software in the guide, click Settings in the Killer Control Center, and toggle Advanced Stream Detect to Off. This will temporarily disable all latency reducing and bandwidth prioritizing features from your Killer networking adapter, but should allow you to download the updated package. Once you have installed the updated Killer Control Center, Advanced Stream Detect will be activated by default. 

Wi-Fi Adapter Disabling

5.0 

There are a few things that can cause your Wi-Fi adapter to disable itself, but, unfortunately they don't really make themselves known up front. Here are some steps you can try to correct the issue:

  • Clean install to the latest Killer Control Center and device drivers by following our clean-install guide here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center
  • Update your machine's BIOS, if an update is available, from your machine or mainboard manufacturer.
  • Update your machine's chipset driver from your machine or mainboard manufacturer.
  • Update your wireless access point's (whatever you connect to wirelessly, be it a Wi-Fi modem, router, or extender) firmware. If the access point is a Wi-Fi modem that is owned by your ISP, you'll have to contact them and have them update the firmware for you. Old firmware can cause this issue as the adapter will disable itself if it receives a large number of bad frames from the access point. 
  • Completely uninstall and reinstall your Killer suite and drivers, using this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/58-clean-install-any-driver - which will ensure that Windows is using only the latest driver files for the Wi-Fi adapter.
  • Change your Wi-Fi adapter's power settings using this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/59-wi-fi-power-settings
  • Use the built-in Network Reset for Windows 10. You can do this by clicking Start and typing Network Reset. You may have to reinstall any VPN adapters, and re-input any Wi-Fi or VPN passwords after using the Network Reset. You may also need to reinstall the network adapter drivers.

If you have done all of the above, but still find that your Wi-Fi adapter is disabling itself, please contact us directly so that we may assist you further!

Problems With The Killer Network Manager

 

The Killer Network Manager is our outgoing performance suite. It is no longer being updated, and does not contain the latest Ethernet or Wi-Fi drivers. We encourage all users of the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 to upgrade to the Killer Control Center, found here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads. This includes users whose machines came with the Killer Network Manager preinstalled. There is no need to continue using the Killer Network Manager.

For a smooth installation, we recommend using our clean-install guide for the Killer Control Center, found here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center.

The old Killer Network Manager suite is still available for download here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/item/e2200-e2400-wireless - but will no longer be updated, and may not be fully compatible with future Windows updates, antivirus suites, or other applications that manipulate network data. The final update for the Killer Network Manager was in April 2017.

How to Update or Install The Killer Network Manager

4.0 

Updating or Installing The Killer Network Manager

The Killer Network Manager is our outgoing performance suite. It is no longer being updated, and does not contain the latest Ethernet or Wi-Fi drivers. We encourage all users of the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 to upgrade to the Killer Control Center. This includes users whose machines came with the Killer Network Manager preinstalled. There is no need to continue using the Killer Network Manager. 

For a smooth installation, we recommend using our clean install method of installing the Killer Control Center, which will use our software remover to remove all previous versions of our suites. You can find our guide, and links, here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center.

The old Killer Network Manager suite is still available for download here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/item/e2200-e2400-wireless - but will no longer be updated, and may not be fully compatible with future Windows updates, antivirus suites, or other applications that manipulate network data. The final update of the Killer Network Manager was April 7, 2017. 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

5.0 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

You may wish to create an Ad-Hoc or Hotspot network with your Killer Adapter on your Windows 10 machine.

With Windows 10, all Ad-Hoc and Hotspot functionality has been officially moved away from the drivers, and into the operating system itself.

If you would like to create a Hotspot or Ad-Hoc network with Windows 10, you simply need to click Start, type Hotspot, and press Enter. All of the relevant settings for your Hotspot network will be on that page.

Hotspot Settings
With Windows 10, this is the current official limit of Hotspot or Ad-Hoc functionality.

The Windows 10 version of our driver does not support the "Hosted Network" feature because Microsoft's own WDI driver does not have support for this. Microsoft is having all wireless vendors move to the WDI model, thus this feature will not work on Windows 10 drivers until after (and if) Microsoft expands support for SoftAP/Wi-Fi Direct.

In the meantime, if you need this feature back for certain older applications that made use of their own Hotspot or Ad-Hoc features, you can load the Windows 8.1 drivers via Device Manager from our INF download. We have verified that this works, and have had confirmation from other users as well.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

For our guide on loading .INF drivers manually in Device Managers, see here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/10-installing-drivers-device-manager

However, we cannot guarantee that Windows Update will not automatically update these drivers, or that they will work flawlessly with Windows 10, as they are, after all, Windows 8.1 drivers. Use Windows 8.1 drivers in Windows 10 at your own risk.

Unfortunately, as the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 only has Windows 10 drivers, this workaround will not work for the 1550.

The Killer 1535/1525/1435 in Ubuntu/Debian

4.0 

Installing The Killer 1535/1525/1435 in Ubuntu/Debian

Ubuntu/Debian 14.04

You will first need to install the latest backports package to have up to date drivers. 

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuBackports#Installing_Backports

Ubuntu/Debian 16.04

The built in drivers should work without any changes, though you may need to update your wireless firmware:

wget http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/main/l/linux-firmware/linux-firmware_1.169.3_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i linux-firmware*.deb
sudo modprobe -r ath10k_pci && sudo modprobe ath10k_pci

The 1535 1525 and 1435 use the community developed and supported ath10k driver. Killer Networking neither develops nor supports the ath10k driver. For further support, please refer either to the community support for you specific Linux distrobution and version, or the driver itself. 

Installing Drivers From .INF Package Through Device Manager

4.1 

Installing Drivers Using Device Manager

If you would like to install the Killer E2200, Killer E2400, Killer Wireless-N, or Killer Wireless-AC drivers without the Killer Performance Suite - you can do so using these steps. Note that this will disable all network prioritization features.

  1. Download the latest .INF package from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/other-downloads
  2. Extract the contens of the package to a location that you will remember.
  3. If you currently have the performance suite installed, you will want to uninstall it first by right-clicking Start, then clicking Apps and Features. Then uninstall all "Killer" labeled applications in this window, including anything labeled "suite" or "driver," and restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
  4. Once your computer is ready, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Locate the Killer Network Adapter in your Device Manager. If it has a driver already installed by Windows, it will be located by its name under Network Adapters. If it has no driver installed, it will be named Ethernet Controller or Unknown Device, as in the screenshot below.
  6. Right-click the adapter, and click Update Driver Software... or Update Driver, whichever is available. 
  7. Click Browse my computer for driver software. 



  8. Click Let me pick from a list of available drivers on my computer
  9. Click Have disk
  10. Click Browse
  11. Navigate to the location where you extracted the standalone driver package earlier. 
  12. From there, you will only have one option, which will be a folder called Production. Double-click that folder.
  13. Double-click your operating system.
  14. Double-click your network adapter.
    1. Eth for all Ethernet Adapters
    2. 11AC1525 for the 1525
    3. 11AC1550 for the 1550
    4. 11AC for the 1535/1435
    5. 11N for all Wireless-N adapters
  15. There will be only one file. Double-click it. 
  16. Click OK
  17. Select your exact model from the list and click Next

 

The final screen should show that you have successfully installed the driver. You can now click on Close.

 

Cannot See Certain Wi-Fi Networks

3.5 

Some users may experience issues with their Killer Wi-Fi adapter not being able to detect certain specific Wi-Fi access points. Here are the things to check for:

  • If you are in Europe and the access point might be on the 2.4 GHz band, it may be using channels 12 or 13. If you have access to the settings on this access point, try changing the the channel to 1, 6, or 11. If not, try updating to the latest version of drivers, which should be able to make use of channels 12 and 13 in European countries - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads
  • Your router or modem may be using a DFS channel. DFS channels are 5 GHz channels that can be used by the public, but public devices receive a "leave the channel" command if official use is necessary. Although Killer Wi-Fi adapters ordinarily have no problem operating on DFS channels, if your laptop has been used in an area where the DFS channel was being used in an official capacity (such as an airport), it may have received the signal to stay off of that channel. For example, in the United States and some parts of Europe, DFS channels are 5 GHz channels 50-144. When troubleshooting a wireless network that does not appear for a specific device, these channels should be avoided in these areas. You can use the chart available on this Wiki page to quickly see which channels are available in your area of the world. We have also noted that some routers will automatically choose DFS channels even though they are not compatible with those same channels, and they must be manually set to a channel in order to not use them. 
  • Your router or modem may need to be power cycled. All routers and modems rely on a very small amount of physical resources and, eventually, those resources will hang, making it necessary to restart them from time to time. The fastest and simplest way to do this is to unplug the device for ten seconds, then plug it back in. This can help even if only one device is having problems with the access point.
  • Your computer may need to be restarted. Restart your computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Note that pressing the power button on most modern computers activates sleep mode - it does not shut them down. In order for your computer to reboot, you must either click Shut Down or Restart
  • You may be too far away from the wireless access point. Wireless signals rely on line of sight and, as such, each individual solid object between your device and the access point diminishes the signal. A single wall may contain multiple solid objects. A floor contains concrete subflooring, wood framing, piping, and various other solid objects. If at all possible, make sure you can connect with another device before assuming any one device is faulty. 
  • There may be interference. 2.4 GHz routers in crowded apartment complexes are especially susceptible to this. You can use the KIller Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to see how many people are sharing your current channel. If too many people are on the same channel as you, it may not be possible to connect to your own access point from too far away. Setting your sideband, or side channel, to 20 MHz can help mitigate this, as the smaller ths sideband, the stronger the signal. 
  • Your wireless profile may have become corrupted. If you have connected to this access point before, but it is no longer visible, you may need to delete the connection's profile and reconnect. Here are the steps:
    • Click the rectangular "Connect" button, where you would normally click to connect to a wireless network, on the bottom, right-hand side of your screen.
    • Click Network and Internet Settings.
    • Click Wi-Fi on the left, if it is not already selected.
    • Click Manage Known Networks
    • Click the network that you are not able to detect.
    • Click the Forget button.
    • Close the Settings window, and connect like normal. If the access point still does not appear, try restarting your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.

If you are still unable to connect to a specific wireless access point, feel free to reach out to our support here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/contact

Router or Modem Issues With Killer 1535/1435

1.8 

Router or Modem Issues With Killer 1535/1435

This article is intended to cover all issues that affect any access point, be it a router or modem, that occur when the Killer Wireless-AC 1535/1435 connects or is connected.

Update September 10 2018: If you have a TP-Link TL-WR841N, and are experiencing restarts when you connect to it with your Killer Wireless-AC 1435 or 1535, contact TP-Link support - https://www.tp-link.com -  for updated firmware which will resolve this issue. The latest published firmware may not resolve the issue, but multiple users have reported that TP-Link support is able to provide them with firmware that does not have this bug. 

The 1535/1435 is a cutting edge Wireless-AC device with MU-MIMO and Transmit Beamforming technology and, as such, not all access points have firmware already installed that is able to handle the connection. Problems that some of our users have reported include:

  • Access point restarts or crashes upon connection, requiring restart
  • Access point restarts or crashes after being connected for some time, requiring restart
  • Access point slows dramatically
  • Access point randomly disconnects all connected devices

The fix for this issue will depend on your personal situation.

 

 

You Own the Access Point

In this case, you are connecting to a device, such as a router, that you own, which is then connected to another device, such as a modem, which is owned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If the device in question is a modem, please be sure that, even if you own the device, your ISP supports any firmware that you flash onto the modem. Most ISPs maintain a list of accepted firmware versions for each device online.

In many such situations, you can update the firmware of your device to resolve this issue. You should first try to update the firmware through the router's interface, if possible. If that is not a feature of that router, or if that does not solve the issue, check for the latest firmware from the official support page of your router. As of April 2018, reports of these issues have decreased significantly. It is possible that the routers listed below have all updated their regular branch firmware to include the fixes that will resolve your issue. If the problem is still not resolved, then see if your router is listed below. Listed below are the routers whose model numbers that we are aware of have issues, along with the location of the updated firmware that the router manufacturer has made available to address the issue:

If you own a different model than the one listed above, and updating to the latest firmware that is available from the support page of your router's manufacturer, we suggest contacting the support for your router, we suggest first updating to the latest Killer Control Center, found here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads. If that does not solve the issue, the next step would be to contact the support for your device and advise them of the steps that you have taken, and ask if they have a beta firmware available. At the same time, please contact our support, as well, using this form - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/contact

 

 

The Access Point is Owned By Your ISP

In this case, it is very possible that the device is running a very old firmware version. Most ISPs only update the firmware at the customer's request, or when it is absolutely necessary in order for the device to continue working on their network, and many ISPs use very old equipment. If you are connecting directly to an ISP owned device, and you are experiencing these issues, then your best bet would be to contact your ISP's support, and request that they update the firmware on the modem. This is usually a simple thing for them to do. If you are unable to resolve this by asking your ISP to update the firmware on the device, please let us know by contacting us here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads/contact - so that we may document the model of the access point that is not fully compatible with our device. In most cases, however, it is due to the age of the device, and a bug in its firmware. If asked, your ISP may be willing to change you to a different model of access point. You might also be able to provide your own access point (sometimes saving a monthly rental fee in the process), or buy your own router to plug into their modem, then use your router as the access point. If you decide to buy your own modem, most ISPs maintain a list of modems that work with their service. If you use multiple devices at the same time on the same access point, there is a good chance that you will see a boost in performance on all devices by providing your own modem. 

 

 

Addressing the Isssue with Drivers

There are some discussion threads where we have commented, linking to specific drivers on our site, where those drivers have now been moved, causing 404 errors, or redirections to this page. Those drivers were links to .INF drivers that could be installed using the Device Manager, to address specific access points crashing when the 1535 would connect to them. These posts and links were created before we had driver-only installers hosted on our website, and were generally just the latest driver-only file that we had available at that moment, as the problem was believed to be cause by the performance suite at the time. You can now download the latest driver-only installer here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/other-downloads. However, this will not always solve the issue, as the issue is sometimes not the performance suite, but that of buggy firmware with the access point. If you wish to try and address the issue by using a driver-only install, you will need to download the driver-only installer, then uninstall all "Killer" entries in your Programs and Features menu, restart your machine, then install the driver-only package. This will remove all Killer network management capability.

We have had some reports of users who were only able to keep their routers stable with only one very specific driver version - usually some Windows 8.1 driver used on a Windows 10 machine. In those cases, we will do our best to locate a copy of that specific version for you but, unfortunately for those cases, Windows Update will often update those drivers anyway, and that is completely out of our control. There are some guides out there on how to prevent Windows Update from updating your device drivers, but we have neither tested nor endorse any particular method of doing so, and we cannot say what the repercussions may be. 

 

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

Users have asked if the E2500, E2400, and E2200 can be used wirelessly. These are Ethernet adapters, so they cannot be used wirelessly. They require an Ethernet cable to be connected to your machine, and to an Internet gateway, such as a modem or router.

Your machine may also come with a wireless adapter, which may or may not be a Killer Networking adapter. If the wireless adapter is not a Killer Networking adapter, the Killer Control Center will report "No Killer Network Interfaces Connected" when you are connected to the Internet with only the non-Killer adapter. This is normal, as the Killer Control Center can only be used with Killer Networking adapters. 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

5.0 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

Users may encounter a situation where their Killer Wireless-AC adapter will not connect to their FIOS router on the 5 GHz Wi-Fi band. 

This seems to be due to the FIOS routers automatically choosing specific DFS channels that they may not fully support. There are a multitude of reports about this phenomenon around the web - where certain devices can connect to them while others cannot - but this post explains it fairly well - https://www.reddit.com/r/HomeNetworking/comments/2tu2so/why_some_devices_cant_see_the_verizon_fios_g1100s.

Fortunately, the fix is simple:

  1. Log in to your FIOS router's setup page. This page explains how to do so with some FIOS routers. It may not include all models. You may have to seek assistance from your ISP. https://www.howtogeek.com/197382/how-to-change-the-wi-fi-channel-on-your-verizon-fios-router/
  2. Change your router's 5 GHz channel. You can use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi analyzer to find which channel has the least traffic, but changing to any channel that is not a DFS channel should allow your devices to connect. Channels 36-48 and 149-165 are non-DFS channels in the United States. Your area may vary. You can reference this chart to find out which channels are DFS channels, and which are not, in your area of the world - - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#5_GHz_(802.11a/h/j/n/ac/ax)
  3. Restart your machine, if necessary, and see if the issue is resolved. 

Wi-Fi Channels 12 and 13

3.8 

Some users have reported problems seeing Wi-Fi access points that are using channels 12 or 13. This is a driver issue that will be corrected in later versions. In the meantime, there is a fairly simple registry tweak, which you can perform, that will enable your machine to see these channels. Note that this method has only been tested in Windows 10. If you have success using this method in Windows 7 or 8.1, please reach out to us at the contact information below and let us know!

  1. Click Start
  2. Type regedit and press Enter
  3. Copy the following, and paste it into the bar beneath File, Edit, View, Favorite, Help: 

    Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
     
  4. Then press Enter. It should jump to a point in the registry that looks like the below picture.
    Registry
  5. Each numbered folder within corresponds with a device on your machine. Unfortunately, from here, it's complete guesswork as to which folder equals which device. Fortunately, it's pretty obvious as you click on each folder. For instance, 0006 is my Killer 1525, as you can see in screenshot. If in doubt, look for the "DriverDesc" entry. They're in alphabetical order. But, again, it should be pretty obvious. If you see it talking about Bluetooth, it's the wrong one. Once you find it, you know where the registry portion for your Killer adapter is hiding. 
  6. On the right pane of the registry editor, find the entry marked "AddNewChannelfor11d". This is our holy grail of channels 12 and 13. It is currently set to a value of 0. Double-click it. Change the value to 1, and click the OK button.
  7. Click File then Exit
  8. You have now activated the adapter's ability to see channels 12 and 13. 

Wi-Fi Issues with 1435/1535/1525 on Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch

2.3 

Wi-Fi Disconnects and Latency with 1435/1535/1525 on Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch

Some users have noted Wi-Fi disconnects and latency on some distros of Linux after recent updates.

This issue likely affects Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch, and may also affect any other Debian-based distros such as Mint, Kali, etc. 

As the ath10k Wi-Fi driver that is used by our Wi-Fi devices in these versions of Linux is a community sourced driver, we have no direct impact on its stability, but since some users have indicated that they have found a fix for these issues, we wanted to share the fix with the rest of our users. 

In summary, the fix is to install the updated firmware and firmware repo, following these steps:

  1. Download https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin and overwrite /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin with the downloaded file.
  2. Download https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/4.4.1/firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1and overwrite /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin.
  3. Restart

Following is a much more detailed, step-by-step guide on how to implement this fix:

  1. Open a Terminal window and navigate to the following location:
    cd /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/
  2. Backup your board-2.bin and firmware-6.bin files:
    sudo mv /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin.bak
    sudo mv /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin.bak
  3. Download the two replacement versions and place them into the '/lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/' folder:
    Download: https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin
    Download: https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/raw/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/4.4.1/firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1
  4. Rename your new 'firmware-6...' file to 'firmware-6.bin':
    sudo mv firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1 firmware-6.bin
  5. Enter ls -la into your terminal to verify the directory looks something like this:
    user@Ubuntu-XPS:/lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0$ ls -la
    total 3168
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Feb 6 15:29 .
    drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 24 2016 ..
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 271412 Feb 6 15:30 board-2.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 271412 Feb 6 15:28 board-2.bin.bak
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 337204 Nov 15 15:56 board-2.bin.wifi-qca6174
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8124 May 12 2016 board.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8124 Dec 1 2016 board.bin.wifi-qca6174
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 733784 Dec 1 2016 firmware-4.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 711408 Feb 6 15:30 firmware-6.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 711408 Feb 6 15:28 firmware-6.bin.bak
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 79689 Dec 1 2016 notice_ath10k_firmware-4.txt
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 82663 Nov 15 15:44 notice_ath10k_firmware-6.txt
  6. Restart your computer.

The 1535 1525 and 1435 use the community developed and supported ath10k driver. Killer Networking neither develops nor supports the ath10k driver. For further support, please refer either to the community support for you specific Linux distrobution and version, or the driver itself.

Resetting Network Devices and Network Stack

5.0 

Resetting Network Devices and Network Stack

Resetting your network devices and network stack, as well as updating your drivers, should be the first line of troubleshooting anytime you encounter a networking issue. Some people know this. However, many people are unaware that there is a proper order to resetting your networking devices, in order for them to synchonize quickly. Following is the fastest and easiest way to resolve most network problems, including, but not limited to Wi-Fi and Ethernet disconnects, slowdowns, and errors, even if these issues are affecting only one computer on your network. To reset your devices in the correct order:

  1. Shut down your computer by clicking Start > Power > Shut Down. Please note that using the power button on your machine is probably set to sleep the machine, not to shut it down. For troubleshooting purposes, the machine must be shut down.
  2. Locate your modem and note the lights on your modem when it is normal and ready. There may be a "Ready" or "Online" light. Taking a picture with a phone is a good tactic, so that you know when it's ready to go.
  3. Trace the Ethernet cord (not the screw-in coaxial cable or the power cord, but the one with a clip) to the next device to determine if you have a router.
  4. Unplug the power cord (either from the back of the device or from the wall, whichever is easier) from your modem, router, and any switches or hubs, between your computer and the modem, as well as any wireless boosters or access points, and leave them all unplugged for now.
  5. Plug in your modem.
  6. Wait until your modem's lights show normal operation again.
  7. Plug in your router, if you have one, and give it about five minutes to boot. Routers typically have no external means of telling if they are ready, but they should be ready after a five minute wait.
  8. Plug in anything else between your computer and the modem.
  9. Power on your computer.
  10. Once your computer is booted back up, if it is not connected to the Internet, or is still having issues, you will want to reset its network stack.

Resetting The Network Stack

Please note that these commands affect all of your networking adapters, both physical and virtual, both used and unused, so you will see some errors during the course of running these commands, where the resets targeted adapters that are not being used. This is perfectly normal, and not a cause for concern. Please complete each step, in order, even if you have done some of these previously, and even if you encounter errors. 

  1. In the search box on the taskbar (click Start), type command prompt, right-click the command prompt result, and then select Run as administrator and confirm.
  2. At the command prompt (decline restarting your machine until you have entered the final command):
    1. Type ipconfig /release and press Enter.
    2. Type ipconfig /flushdns and press Enter.
    3. Type ipconfig /renew and press Enter. (this will stall for a moment)
    4. Type netsh int ip reset and press Enter. (don't restart yet)
    5. Type netsh winsock reset and press Enter.
  3. Now restart your machine using Start > Power > Restart once more and test to see if the issue is resolved.

 

Killer 1550 in Linux Debian/Ubuntu 16.04+

 

Killer 1550 in Debian/Ubuntu 16.04+

Some users have expressed a desire to use the Killer 1550 in Debian-based Linux. If your version of Linux does not support the Killer Wireless-1550 at install, and you are using Ubuntu 16.04 or later, or another version of Debian Linux, you can use this guide to backport the drivers from the latest version of Ubuntu/Debian, enabling the Killer 1550 in 16.04 or later. We have confirmed that this will result in wireless connectivity in Ubuntu 16.04 with the Killer Wireless-AC 1550. 

Please note that Secure Boot must be disabled in your BIOS before following these steps. If you are unsure how to disable Secure Boot, please refer to your machine or motherboard's support materials or website.

Type or copy and paste the following commands in a terminal:

$ sudo apt-get install git
$ git clone https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/iwlwifi/backport-iwlwifi.git
$ cd backport-iwlwifi
$ make defconfig-iwlwifi-public
$ sed -i 's/CPTCFG_IWLMVM_VENDOR_CMDS=y/# CPTCFG_IWLMVM_VENDOR_CMDS is not set/' .config
$ make -j4
$ sudo make install

Then restart. After the kernel update, you will need to run these commands in terminal:

$ cd backport-iwlwifi
$ make clean
$ make defconfig-iwlwifi-public
$ make -j4
$ sudo make install

Once this is done, you should be able to connect to your wireless access point.

Credit goes to Jeremy31 on StackExchange for the guide - https://askubuntu.com/questions/1016903/alienware-17-r4-ubuntu-16-04-wifi-driver

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.