Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

4.3 

Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

Some users have contacted us regarding their Killer Networking adapters not working after a Windows Update. This has affected various adapters, including the 1525, 1535, and 1550. Although we are as yet unsure exactly which update is causing this issue, there seems to be a connection with specific machine manufacturers having pushed an outdated version of the Killer Control Center through Windows Update, along with extremely outdated wireless drivers, which leads to a corrupted device driver.

The following troubleshooting steps should allow you to resolve the issue. 

  1. If your machine has Internet access through Ethernet, or if you are able to move files onto the machine using a USB thumb drive or some other medium, clean installing to the most recent version of the Killer Control Center and device drivers is the best way to resolve this issue. Click here for the guide on clean installing the latest Killer Control Center and device drivers. 
  2. (Code 10) If the clean install does not solve the issue, try manually installing the latest device drivers for your Killer Wireless device. This will hopefully replace the corrupted device driver. Click here for the guide to manually install drivers in Device Manager.
  3. If manually installing the driver does not resolve the issue, or if the network adapter is not present in Device Manager, try clean installing the drivers in Device Manager. This is different than clean installing the Killer Control Center or simply manually installing the drivers in Device Manager. This will hopefully remove the corrupted driver from the Windows Driver Store, allowing you to update to a working driver. Click here for our guide on clean installing drivers in Device Manager.
  4. If none of the above resolves the issue, then the issue may be due to something that is not strictly related to your wireless adapter or drivers, but is causing the adapter to malfunction. Check the support downloads page for your machine or motherboard manufacturer and make sure that you have the latest BIOS available, as well as the latest chipset drivers available. 
  5. If none of the above resolves your issue, you may need to uninstall whatever update caused the issue. Click here for our guide on uninstalling Windows Updates. Please note that this guide only refers to Microsoft Windows Updates specifically. It's possible that the update that caused the issue was not an update to Microsoft Windows, but an update to something else on your system. Keep that in mind if you find yourself manually uninstalling recent updates, which is otherwise covered in the linked guide. 
  6. If you have followed every step in this guide and still have not been able to establish wireless connectivity, try discharging your machine to reset the CMOS. Click here for our guide on discharging your machine. 
  7. If none of the above resolved the issue, then you may need to resort to resetting Windows. This may result in lost files and applications, so restoring a backup is preferable, if you have one available. Click here for Microsoft's information on resetting Windows and click "Reset your PC." Please be sure to read exactly what the reset will entail. Alternatively, you may find that other options on that page may better fit your needs. If you do go this route, make sure you install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers as soon as Windows updates to 1803 or later, before other updates can take place. This is best done using our clean install guide (click here). To find out which version of Windows is currently installed, click Start, type winver, and press Enter. Refer to the "Version" number. When resetting  your PC or reinstalling Windows, this number may change as Windows updates. As soon as the build is 1803 or newer, install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers using the clean install guide. 
  8. Unfortunately, if none of the above resolves your issue, your next step will be to contact your machine or motherboard manufacturer for RMA or repair options. When a wireless network adapter's driver is updated, the firmware on the chip is flashed. If none of the above solved the problem, then this indicates that the adapter is no longer capable of accepting a flash, and will need to be replaced. Alternatively, the machine or motherboard manufacturer may have an unpublished BIOS update or chipset driver that can resolve the issue. 

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

2.7 

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

code 10 device cannot start

Update September 15 2018 - Windows 10 1809, which is currently being released in October 2018, seems to have caused many of these issues since its release. If you are unable to resolve this issue by following this knowledge base article, you may need to revert your operating system back to the Windows 10 1803 to restore functionality. While we do not yet have a guide for this, there are quite a few around the web, such as this excellent guide for rolling back to Windows 10 1803. 

We have seen many Code 10 errors lately from machines where Windows 10 has automatically updated the drivers from older versions. These errors do not mean that your adapter has actually failed. This is an issue with Windows 10, and getting the proper drivers installed will correct the issue. 

First, try updating to the latest Killer Control Center, which contains the latest suite and drivers. You can find that download here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/driver-downloads. If you have any problems with the install, we suggest using our clean install guide here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center

If you have no way of getting drivers onto the machine (no USB thumb drive, no other means of connecting to the Internet with this machine) then click here to jump down to the alternate guide to fixing Code 10 errors.

If you have installed the latest Killer Control Center and restarted the machine, and that did not clear the Code 10 error, you can usually clear it by cleaning out the driver store. Here are the steps to clear out the driver store, and install the latest driver:

  1. Make sure you have the latest Killer Control Center installer handy on the machine (you may need to use a USB thumb drive or some other medium if you can't access the Internet with the machine). 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. You can hold off on restarting for now if an uninstaller says to do so.
  3. Close Apps and Features and right-click Start and click Device Manager
  4. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  5. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager. The adapter will probably reappear, and may or may not still show a Code 10, but I would suggest continuing with this guide either way.
  8. Repeat steps 4-7 until you no longer have the option to Delete the driver software for this device. Note that you could keep doing this indefinitely, as Windows will always install a default driver, but once you can no longer Delete the driver software for this device, you have accomplished the goal of clearing out all of the drivers that we were trying to clear out, and so you're done by that point.
  9. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. 
  10. Once the machine has restarted, run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If everything doesn't look perfect, restart the machine after the installation, even if the installer did not say to do so. 

If that does not resolve the issue for you, and you are still seeing the Code 10 error, then you will need to load the driver manually through Device Manager. Click here for our guide on installing a driver manually with Device Manager. 

 

 

The Alternate Guide to Fixing Code 10 Errors

This guide is only intended for use when you cannot get drivers onto the machine using a USB drive or an alternate means of Internet access, such as an installed Wi-Fi adapter.

  1. Close all other applications, as you will need to allow restarts as they are requested. If you regain connectivity after a restart, click here to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. If an installer requests a restart at any point, click to allow it to restart. 
  3. Once the machine has restarted, test to see if the issue is resolved. 
  4. If not, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  8. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. Once the machine has restarted, check to see if the issue is resolved. 
  9. If not, repeat steps 4 - 8 until you regain Internet connectivity. Once you do, remember to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 

If you have any further issues or questions, feel free to reach out to support at https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/contact

Driver Errors in Device Manager

 

This article explains how to address each error that a user may encounter while using Killer devices.

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