Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Troubleshooting

TP-Link TL-WR841N Restarts When Killer 1435/1535 Connects

 

TP-Link TL-WR841N Restarts When Killer 1435/1535 Connects

Some users have experienced issues with the TP-Link TL-WR841N router restarting when the Killer Wireless-AC 1435 or 1535 connects to it. This is due to a bug in the router's firmware. If the latest available firmware from https://www.tp-link.com does not resolve the issue, multiple users have confirmed with us that they have been able to contact TP-Link support, who will provide them with a version of the firmware that resolves this issue. 

Wi-Fi Drops and Disconnects

 

Wi-Fi Drops and Disconnects

Please note that this article is not meant to be followed step-by-step to completion. Instead, it's a list of suggestions that are known to be fixes for wireless drops and disconnects, with the most effective suggestions at the top. Once you find something that works, there is no need to read or implement the rest of this guide. 

Drops and disconnects are, unfortunately, still a part of using Wi-Fi Internet. They're frustrating, and they seem to happen at the worst, most annoying times, but with all of the different technology that has to come together to work correctly, it's surprising that Wi-Fi is generally very reliable! 

We want your Killer Wireless adapter to be the most reliable part of your Wi-Fi connection, so we have put together the steps that you can take, when you are encountering Wi-Fi drops, that are most likely to resolve the issue. Some of them are specific to our adapter, while some are more general. This is because, in our experience, most Wi-Fi disconnects are due more to the wireless environment than any specific wireless adapter. Here are the steps that our experience has shown are most likely to solve Wi-Fi disconnect issues:

  1. Update your Wi-Fi adapter's drivers to the latest available from our website. Click here for instructions on how to clean install the latest Killer Control Center that is appropriate for your Windows build. 
  2. Update your motherboard or machine's BIOS. This is especially true if you are using a laptop, as laptop manufacturer's are constantly releasing BIOS updates to address Wi-Fi issues. You can usually easily find the support downloads section for your specific machine or motherboard by using Google to search your machine's model number, followed by "downloads." Make sure you read the instructions before you flash the BIOS!
  3. Update your motherboard or machine's chipset drivers. These control resources within Windows. You can also find these on your support download page. If the manufacturer has not updated in a long time, you can also go straight to the chipset manufacturer (Intel or AMD) and get newer, but more generic chipset drivers. Your results may vary, with those.
  4. Reset your entire network and network stack using this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/93-resetting-network-devices-and-network-stack. Even if you have done some of these things at various points, it's worth it to do all of them, in that order, to make sure everything is reset correctly.
  5. Make sure Windows install is completely updated by clicking Start, then type Update, click Check for Updates, click Check for Updates again, and let it install anything it finds. If it finds anything, restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart, then repeat the process. Do this until there are no updates just after a fresh restart. 
  6. If you are using any antivirus or firewall application, temporarily uninstall it, then restart your machine. Unfortunately, disabling these applications does not prevent them from manipulating network packets - they have to be temporarily uninstalled. If this resolves the issue, you may be able to simply reinstall the application using a freshly downloaded copy, and the disconnects may not return. If they do return, refer to the support team for that application. 
  7. Change your Wi-Fi adapter's power settings. You can find the step-by-step instructions for that here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/59-wi-fi-power-settings
  8. Check your Wi-Fi signal strength. You can see this in the Killer Control Center in the Wi-Fi Analyzer menu after clicking your Wi-Fi network (make sure to switch to 5 GHz if you are using a 5 GHz network, or 2.4 GHz if you are using a 2.4 GHz network). You will see "Signal Strength" appear at the bottom of the Killer Control Center. Anything below 80% and you are very likely to see drops and disconnects, especially when transferring large files or gaming. If the signal strength is below 80% when  you are in the same room as the access point, with clear line of sight between the laptop and the access point, then there is very likely something wrong with the machine's antennas. If you can't get 100% signal strength when within 5 feet of the wireless access point, then the issue is definitely an antenna issue. In this case, you will need to contact the machine manufacturer for repair or RMA options, unless you feel comfortable opening the machine and checking the antenna leads yourself. 
  9. Experiment with changing your Wi-Fi adapter's Device Manager settings. Try changing one setting at a time, then testing, to see if the change helped. To get to these, right-click Start, click Device Manager, double-click Network Adapters, double-click your wireless adapter, click the Advanced tab. Then, click the following settings in the "Property" box, and change their values in the "Value" box:
    1. Dynamic MIMO Power Save: Experiment with disabling 
    2. Preferred Band: If you know for certain that either 5 GHz (often Wireless-AC) or 2.4 GHz (often-Wireless-N) wireless signals should work better in your situation, you can try setting a preference here.
    3. Roaming Aggressiveness: This determines how quickly your wireless adapter will switch access points when there are multiple saved access points in range. If the aggressiveness is set too low, it is more likely to hang on to an access point with low signal strength, even if there is a better option available. If it is set too high, you will experience Wi-Fi drops if multiple nearby access points have similar signal strengths, as the adapter will switch between them often, disrupting the data flow. If you have multiple saved access points in range, this setting deserves tweaking and testing. 
    4. Wireless Mode: This dictates which types of wireless connections to which your adapter is allowed to connect. Generally speaking, this should be left to its highest available setting, such as 12 - 11 a/b/g/n/ac, which means the adapter will connect to Wireless-A, B, G, N, or Wireless-AC access points. However, some users have reported that, especially with older Wireless-N access points, restricting Wireless-AC adapters to 09 - 11 a/g/n has improved Wi-Fi reliability for them. If you are unlikely to encounter Wireless-AC access points and speeds, this is certainly worth exploring.  The only types of wireless connection that are currently in widespread use are Wireless N, AC, and, to a much lesser degree, Wireless-G. 
  10. If you are only experiencing problems with one network, and the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer shows that you have a signal strength of over 80, then the access point probably needs a firmware update.
    1. If this is your own home network, and you are using a router which you have purchased and connected to the modem that is provided by your Internet Service Provider, updating firmware is usually easily done. Refer to your specific router manufacturer’s instructions on doing this. If the router sports automatic firmware updating, don't trust it. Check the version that is loaded on the device against the current version available on the device's website. Very often, you'll find that you are not running the latest version, and that you will need to manually update.
    2. If this is your home network, and you are connecting wirelessly to the modem that is provided by your ISP, then you will need to contact your ISP and have them update your firmware. This is usually a quick click of a button and a small wait for their support team, but they will sometimes say that their modems update automatically. Ask them to please verify, by firmware version number, that your modem is using the most up-to-date firmware version. 
  11. One other thing you can try is the Windows Network Reset. This will reistall your adapter, and will reset many things that are not easily accessible otherwise. This will also reset all saved Wi-Fi networks, including their passwords, and will remove all associations with any virtual adapters. To use this, simply click Start, type Network Reset, click Network Reset, and follow the prompts until completion. 
  12. You should also investigate your wireless landscape. Many Wi-Fi drops and connection issues are due to radio conflicts. You can use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to determine which channels are least used on each band (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) and change your Wi-Fi router's settings accordingly. Here are some tips on which settings to choose:

    1. On the 2.4 GHz band, always choose Channels 1, 11, or 6. Try to pick the emptiest of the three, using the Wi-Fi Analyzer as your guide. Channels other than 1, 11, or 6 will receive more interference. European users can also use Channels 12 and 13 on the 2.4 GHz band. If you are in Europe, and your Killer Wireless device cannot see networks on Channels 12 and 13, please see this guide - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/61-wi-fi-channels-12-and-13
    2. On the 5 GHz band, choose a channel that is as far away from other channels as possible. If you are experiencing Wi-Fi drops and you are using a DFS channel, (Channels 50-144 in the USA, other areas can be found on this chart), try changing to another 5 GHz channel and see if that improves the issue. 
    3. If you do have to share a channel, or if there are competing networks close to yours, set your sideband or side channel (the name of the setting will depend on your router manufacturer) to 20 MHz. This creates a tight, more powerful signal. Higher sidebands should only be considered if you have no Wi-Fi radio competition, but need the signal to get around solid objects. 
    4. If you have extenders, access points, or any other wireless routers, make sure they are operating on a different channel than your primary router. Even a single Wi-Fi router with multiple radios can conflict with itself if those radios are set to the same channel. 
    5. Do not depend on "auto" settings if you are experiencing problems. They are not always reliable, and will often switch to less desirable configurations.
    6. Consider that Wi-Fi is a line-of-sight radio technology. Each solid between the antenna of your wireless access point (router/modem) and your computer will diminish the signal. Repositioning things by inches can make a world of difference. 
    7. Try changing your channel width (some routers may call it sideband or side channel). This is another area where many routers are, by default, set to "auto", but don't do a very good job. The higher the channel width, the more data the stream can carry, making it potentially faster, and the more likely it is to get around solid objects. However, the signal will have overall less strength, and will be more prone to interference from other nearby channels. Depending your Wi-Fi landscape, it may be best to give up some channel width in order to get the extra strength and dodge interference, even if your router and adapter can handle higher channel widths.
      1. On the 5 GHz band, set the channel width to 40 MHz and see if that improves reliability. 
      2. On the 2.4 GHz band, set the channel width to 20 MHz and see if that improves reliability. 

If none of these solve the issue for you, please feel free to reach out to support by clicking Contact Support under Support at the top of the website.  

Bluescreen Errors

2.0 

Bluescreen Errors

Users may encounter bluescreen errors referencing "RfeCoSvc", "bwcW10x64", or "QCAmain10x64". These errors have been addressed with more recent versions of the Killer Control Center and the drivers included. You can download the latest Killer Control Center from here - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64.

The Killer Control Center has replaced the Killer Network Manager, and the Killer Network Manager is no longer being developed. The Killer Control Center is fully compatible with the E2200, E2400, and the E2500, as well as all of our Wireless-N and Wireless-AC network adapters. 

For a smooth install, it is recommended that you:

  1. Download the latest installer, saving it in a place that you will remember.
  2. Right-click Start
  3. Click Apps and Features
  4. Uninstall all entries with the title of "Killer Suite," "Killer Drivers," or any variation of those titles. 
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Avoid using the power button on the computer, as it is likely mapped to sleep the machine instead of shutting it down.
  6. Once the computer has booted back up, run the installer that you downloaded for the latest Killer Control Center. 

If you encounter any problems in following the above steps, please see this article - Problems Updating Killer Control Center.

If you encounter blue screen errors while using the latest suite downloaded from this website, please contact support.

 

Internet Problems With New Computers With Killer 1550

 

Internet Problems With New Computers With Killer 1550

Some users may encounter issues with new computers with the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 installed. These issues can usually be resolved by updating the Killer Control Center to the latest version, available here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you are unable to download the updated package, click Settings in the Killer Control Center, and toggle Advanced Stream Detect to Off. This will temporarily disable all latency reducing and bandwidth prioritizing features from your Killer networking adapter, but should allow you to download the updated package. Once you have the latest Killer Control Center downloaded, double-click it to begin the install. When the install is complete, Advanced Stream Detect will be activated by default. 

Wi-Fi or Bluetooth Missing

3.0 

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Missing

Note: This guide can be used in the event of any M.2 device vanishing from the Device Manager. The procedure lists Killer devices specifically, but the phenomenon is widespread among M.2 devices and Windows 10, and these same steps can be used to restore functionality when any M.2 device disappears from Device Manager.

When this occurs, it is an issue of the BIOS or the operating system not enumerating the device properly. In very rare situations, it can be cause by some kind of physical trauma causing the device to become dislodged, or the device failing, but more often than not, the hardware is just fine. It’s just a matter of getting Windows or, sometimes, the BIOS, to see it again. Sometimes the device will be missing altogether, or sometimes it will be grayed out - the difference is only in whether your Device Manager is set to show devices that are no longer present in the machine. Either way, the Device Manager thinks that the device is gone, and that is what needs to be addressed.

  • First off, if the issue is that your Bluetooth is missing, but your Wi-Fi device is still present in Device Manager, make sure that you do not have any USB devices disabled. The internal Bluetooth adapter is actually a USB device, so if there are any USB devices disabled in your Device Manager, for any reason, this can cause the Bluetooth device to vanish. If you are unable to enable the USB device, then you should resolve that issue first. This includes USB Hub devices, or any devices under the Universal Serial Bus controllers category in Device Manager that show any errors, for any reason. On some platforms, this is the #1 cause of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapters mysteriously vanishing from the Device Manager. Once you have resolved the USB issue, restart your machine, and check to see if the missing device has reappeared in your Device Manager. If you have recently plugged anything new into a USB port on your machine, unplug it and see if the error goes away in Device Manager. That USB device may be malfunctioning.  If there is nothing to remove, try these steps:
    • Right-click on the entry and click Enable, if applicable. If the only option is Disable, then the entry was already enabled.
    • Right-click on the entry with the error and click Update Driver > Search Automatically for Updated Driver.
    • Right-click on the entry with the error and click Uninstall Device > Uninstall, and then restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
    • Visit your machine or mainboard's support page and update your BIOS, chipset drivers, and USB drivers (if listed). 
    • Discharging the machine can also be helpful in clearing USB error codes. 

USB Error

Once you no longer have any disabled USB devices, the Bluetooth device should show back up. 

  • If you do not have any disabled USB devices, or any with errors, or if you have resolved that issue and the Wi-Fi or Bluetooth adapter has not reappeared in the Device Manager, then you will still need to update your chipset drivers, and possibly your machine or mainboard’s BIOS, if you haven't already. We have noted that some platforms have chipset drivers that are buggy enough that they absolutely will experience this issue if their chipset drivers are not updated. You will need to obtain these drivers from your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support download page. You can usually find this page by going to the main website for your machine or mainboard manufacturer and looking under "Support", or by using your preferred search engine to search for your specific model, then selecting the result that leads to your machine or mainboard manufacturer's website. Once you have found the support downloads page, if you cannot tell which drivers are the chipset drivers, it is generally recommended that you simply update all of the offered drivers, except for the Killer Network card drivers, which you should get from us, as they are likely more recent. If there is a BIOS update available, then updating the BIOS is also recommended, especially if the BIOS update notes mention anything that might pertain to this situation. Make certain that you at least update the chipset and USB drivers, if applicable. Some platforms combine the USB drivers into the chipset drivers, so you may not see a separate download. Once you have done these updates, restart the machine, and see if the missing device reappears in the Device Manager.
  • Depending on what is available, the best order in which to update is as follows:
    1. Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    2. Update your chipset drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    3. Update the USB drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page.  If none are listed, they are probably rolled into the chipset driver. 
    4. Update all other drivers available from your machine or mainboard's support page, except Killer Networking and Bluetooth drivers, which you should get from us.
    5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  • Windows itself can also play a part in the disappearing device. The Anniversary Update saw many such devices vanish, so much so that the Creator’s Update added a Bluetooth troubleshooter to Windows 10. Make sure that your Windows installation is up to date by using Windows Search to search Windows Update

    windows update

    then press Enter, and click Check for Updates

  • Once it has downloaded and installed everything it finds, restart the machine, and repeat this process until Windows Update finds no updates directly after restarting. Once this happens, check to see if the device has reappeared in the Device Manager. If this doesn’t help, and the issue is Bluetooth related, you can try troubleshooting using Windows built-in troubleshooter. Microsoft has instructions here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14169/windows-10-fix-bluetooth-problems-faq
  • Discharging the machine - If the device is still missing from the Device Manager, then that means that it isn’t the chipset drivers (or at least it isn’t only the chipset drivers) that is not properly enumerating the device, but rather the BIOS itself. In this case, you will need to discharge the machine to force the BIOS to re-enumerate all of its hardware (instructions below). Before you do this, make sure that you have updated the BIOS to the latest version, from the mainboard or machine manufacturer’s website, so that you address the flaw that caused this issue in the first place. Once that BIOS update is in place, and you have confirmed that the machine has booted back up, but the device is still not appearing in Device Manager, shut the machine back down, and unplug it from the wall. You will now need to fully discharge the machine.
    • If this is a desktop, you will need to remove the side panel, discharge yourself of static electricity on something metal (your computer’s case might work, or possibly your desk) and look for the CMOS battery. It is a large coin-cell battery. Remove that battery. Sometimes it’s easier with a flathead screwdriver, but it should be fairly simple to remove. Once you have removed that battery, press the power button on the machine 2-3 times to completely discharge it, then replace the CMOS battery and the case. If you are not comfortable doing this on your own, please refer to your mainboard or machine's support. 
    • If this is a laptop, hopefully it is one where you can easily remove the battery. This will be specific to your model of laptop, so you may need to refer to your owner’s manual, or your laptop’s support website. Some MSI models are held in with a single screw. If you are able to remove the laptop battery, do so, and then press the laptop’s power button a few times to fully discharge it.
    • If this is a laptop, but you are unable to remove the battery, or would prefer not to, you can discharge the machine through usage, instead. Unplug the laptop from the electric outlet, and temporarily change the power plan to a setting that does not allow it to sleep when the battery is low, then run the laptop until it discharges itself and will no longer power on. Once it has discharged itself, press the power button a few times to make sure it is fully discharged.
    • Once you have a fully discharged machine, put it back together, plug it back in, and let it boot in to Windows. You may see a message mentioning setting the BIOS to defaults, or something along those lines. This is nothing to be alarmed about – simply confirm that you want it set to defaults, unless you had set custom settings, in which case, you will need to re-set those custom settings. In the future, this message may be a warning that your CMOS or laptop battery is dead or on its last legs, but for now, we know that you discharged the machine on purpose, so we can safely ignore this warning. Once you are booted back in to Windows, check the Device Manager to make sure that the missing Wi-Fi or Bluetooth device is no longer missing.
  • In some very rare cases, the device may not show up because the machine was not fully discharged. We have had users report that they were able to repeat the steps to discharge their machines a second time, and have had success after that. Once the updates were in place, and the devices shows up, that is usually the end of the problem.

One final step that you can take, if you are willing and able to do so, is to physically reseat your Wi-Fi adapter. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device are on the same card, so there is only one adapter to reseat, and reseating this adapter only requires that you remove one screw, slide it out of the slot, then slide it back in and screw it back down, being careful not to dislodge or damage the attached antenna leads. However, the difficulty in getting to this adapter and performing this step will vary depending on your machine or mainboard, and your level of expertise. You may wish to consult with your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support at this point. If you have followed all of the other steps, and the device still has not reappeared, the device, or the mainboard, may also be physically damaged, and in need of repair, which would also necessitate contacting your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support for RMA or repair options.  

Wi-Fi Power Settings

 
Unfortunately, Wi-Fi drops and performance problems are all too common with Windows, and Microsoft has addressed the issue, essentially placing the blame on the wireless access points. You can read about that here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/928152/you-may-experience-connectivity-issues-or-performance-issues-when-you - but, to summarize, the default power plan is not ideal for Wi-Fi, and Microsoft's suggestion is to maximize power going to the Wi-Fi adapter and remove the ability for Windows to turn the adapter off to save power.
 
With some users, this has fixed all of their issues. With others, it has not helped at all. However, if you're experiencing issues like Wi-Fi drops, slowdowns, or latency, it's worth adjusting.
 
Doing this can potentially cause slightly shorter battery life. However, this is a good way to troubleshoot whether the issue is related to the power saving features of your machine and/or access point. You may find that making thes changes makes no noticeable change in your machine's battery life. On the other hand, you may find that there is a noticeable effect, in which case you can simply switch the power profile back. 
  1. To check your power settings: 
  2. Right click Start
  3. Click Power Options
  4. Click Additional Power Options on the right.
  5. Click Change Plan Options on the currently selected power plan
  6. Click Change Advanced Power Settings
  7. Click Wireless Adapter Settings
  8. Under "Power Saving Mode" change “Setting” to Maximum Performance on both “On battery” and “Plugged in"
  9. Click Okay then Save Changes.
  10. Close all Power Options windows
  11. Right-click your Start Button and click Device Manager
  12. Find the Network Adapters heading and double-click it.
  13. Find your Killer Wireless Adapter and double-click it.
  14. Click the Power Management tab.
  15. Make sure the box for Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power is not checked.
  16. Click OK
  17. If you are missing any of these options, then that means your machine's manufacturer has disabled them in the registry. Many of our users have had luck using the method described here. Please note that the registry changes made in these guides make no permanent changes to your system other than to make the settings available for you to change. The registry files do not actually make the changes - they only add back the setting options that are present in normal Windows 10 installs, but have been removed in some..

If changing your Wi-Fi power settings does not help, we suggest having a look at our Wi-Fi Drops and Disconnects guide here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/107-wi-fi-drops-and-disconnects

Wi-Fi Adapter Disabling

5.0 

There are a few things that can cause your Wi-Fi adapter to disable itself, but, unfortunately they don't really make themselves known up front. Here are some steps you can try to correct the issue:

If you have done all of the above, but still find that your Wi-Fi adapter is disabling itself, please contact us directly so that we may assist you further!

Bluetooth Issues

 

Some users may experience issues with Bluetooth devices. These issues may include, but are not limited to:

  • Unable to discover any devices
  • Unable to discover the devices you wish to use
  • Unable to pair with devices
  • Devices pair but do not work correctly
  • Devices pair and work correctly but intermittently
  • Devices pair and work correctly but disconnect intermittently

The first thing to do is to make sure you have the latest Bluetooth driver installed. Bluetooth drivers for Killer devices are not included in any other package, and must be downloaded and installed separately. They can be found here - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/bluetooth. Once you have run the installer for the Bluetooth driver, check to make sure that the latest driver has been installed. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Right-click Start
  2. Click Device Manager
  3. Double-click Bluetooth
  4. Locate your Bluetooth adapter, which should be labeled Qualcomm (something something) Bluetooth 4.1. See image below.



  5. Right-click on your Bluetooth adapter and click Properties, and click the Driver tab. Make sure that the number beside Driver Version corresponds with the current Driver Version listed in the Bluetooth download page for your device. See below image. Note that this image only highlights the location of the driver version number. Do not compare the number to this image - compare to the current version on the download page.

    Bluetooth Driver Version

  6. If the correct driver version number is not displayed, you may have to install the Bluetooth driver manually. Please see this guide - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/49-installing-bluetooth-drivers-from-device-manager
  7. Once the Bluetooth driver is up to date, restart your machine by clicking Power > Start > Restart, then test to see if the issue is resolved.

If the issue is not resolved, then the problem could be due to a variety of causes. Found below are the most common fixes for Bluetooth problems, which we update regularly:

  • Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Update your chipset driver from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Update the drivers for any other device on your machine that uses any kind of wireless technology, as it may be interfering with your Bluetooth device. For example, if your machine is equipped with Thunderbolt 
  • If you have a dual-band Wi-Fi connection, use the 5 GHz connection instead of the 2.4 GHz connection. Bluetooth operates on the 2.4 GHz band, and 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi can cause interference with Bluetooth.
  • In your Wi-Fi router or modem's settings page, change the sideband or side channel of your 2.4 GHz radio to 20 MHz. This creates a tighter radio wave that is less likely to cause interference to other 2.4 GHz devices.
  • Change your Wi-Fi router or modem's 2.4 GHz channel. Try to stick to Channels 1, 11, or 6. Use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to see which channel has the least interference. If you are already on that channel, switch to the next least interference, and see if that improves your Bluetooth issues. 
  • If you have any USB wireless devices on connected to your machine, try unplugging them and see if that improves your Bluetooth issues. If it does, try moving the USB dongle to a different USB port, as far away from the original port as possible. 
  • Some monitors and LCD displays and televisions can cause interference with higher 2.4 GHz channels. If you are experiencing issues near such a device, try changing the 2.4 GHz channel on your wireless router to 1 or 6 to free up as much space as possible in the upper bands, to reduce interference. 
  • Poorly shielded cabling for external devices, especially high powered devices like hard drives or external media readers and writers, can cause radio interference. If the issue is especially prevalent when using such devices, try replacing the cables.  

There are many other things that can cause wireless interference. If you are experiencing otherwise unresolved Bluetooth issues, either try to avoid being physically near these potential contributors to interference, or take measures to increase and improve shielding, to decrease interference. 

  • Microwave ovens
  • Cabling and connectors for Direct Satellite Service (DSS) (If these are old, consider replacing them)
  • Poorly shielded power lines in the wall
  • 2.4 GHz cordless phones (these may have a channel switch on them - try changing it) 
  • Wireless RF security video recorders
  • Wireless speakers (for computer or otherwise)
  • Any other wireless device, such as microwave transmitters, wireless cameras, baby monitors, or even a neighbor's Wi-Fi device, if you live in close proximity, where their Wi-Fi device may be just on the other side of the wall, can potentially cause enough interference on the 2.4 GHz band to completely disable Bluetooth.

The Bluetooth standard is usually very good at finding a space in which to operate, regardless of interference, and the vast majority of the time, it does this without any user interaction. Unfortunately, though, sometimes there is just too much interference, or the interference unbalances the 2.4 GHz wavelength in such a way, that it is impossible to make a connection. You will never eliminate all sources of interference. There are just too many devices that are constantly bombarding the 2.4 GHz band, which is why the 5 GHz band was introduced for Wi-Fi. The goal in troubleshooting Bluetooth interference is to eliminate enough interference for the Bluetooth adapter to be able to find a spot with which to make a good connection. 

If you are unable to eliminate causes of Bluetooth interference, it is possible to increase shielding. Metal, concrete, and plaster are all very good at reflecting and/or absorbing radio waves, as is brick, to a lesser degree, so consider that when relocating your machine to move away from any interference. 

Cannot See Certain Wi-Fi Networks

 

Some users may experience issues with their Killer Wi-Fi adapter not being able to detect certain specific Wi-Fi access points. Here are the things to check for:

  • If you are in Europe and the access point might be on the 2.4 GHz band, it may be using channels 12 or 13. If you have access to the settings on this access point, try changing the the channel to 1, 6, or 11. If not, try updating to the latest version of drivers, which should be able to make use of channels 12 and 13 in European countries - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
  • Your router or modem may be using a DFS channel. DFS channels are 5 GHz channels that can be used by the public, but public devices receive a "leave the channel" command if official use is necessary. Although Killer Wi-Fi adapters ordinarily have no problem operating on DFS channels, if your laptop has been used in an area where the DFS channel was being used in an official capacity (such as an airport), it may have received the signal to stay off of that channel. For example, in the United States and some parts of Europe, DFS channels are 5 GHz channels 50-144. When troubleshooting a wireless network that does not appear for a specific device, these channels should be avoided in these areas. You can use the chart available on this Wiki page to quickly see which channels are available in your area of the world. We have also noted that some routers will automatically choose DFS channels even though they are not compatible with those same channels, and they must be manually set to a channel in order to not use them. 
  • Your router or modem may need to be power cycled. All routers and modems rely on a very small amount of physical resources and, eventually, those resources will hang, making it necessary to restart them from time to time. The fastest and simplest way to do this is to unplug the device for ten seconds, then plug it back in. This can help even if only one device is having problems with the access point.
  • Your computer may need to be restarted. Restart your computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Note that pressing the power button on most modern computers activates sleep mode - it does not shut them down. In order for your computer to reboot, you must either click Shut Down or Restart
  • You may be too far away from the wireless access point. Wireless signals rely on line of sight and, as such, each individual solid object between your device and the access point diminishes the signal. A single wall may contain multiple solid objects. A floor contains concrete subflooring, wood framing, piping, and various other solid objects. If at all possible, make sure you can connect with another device before assuming any one device is faulty. 
  • There may be interference. 2.4 GHz routers in crowded apartment complexes are especially susceptible to this. You can use the KIller Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to see how many people are sharing your current channel. If too many people are on the same channel as you, it may not be possible to connect to your own access point from too far away. Setting your sideband, or side channel, to 20 MHz can help mitigate this, as the smaller ths sideband, the stronger the signal. 
  • Your wireless profile may have become corrupted. If you have connected to this access point before, but it is no longer visible, you may need to delete the connection's profile and reconnect. Here are the steps:
    • Click the rectangular "Connect" button, where you would normally click to connect to a wireless network, on the bottom, right-hand side of your screen.
    • Click Network and Internet Settings.
    • Click Wi-Fi on the left, if it is not already selected.
    • Click Manage Known Networks
    • Click the network that you are not able to detect.
    • Click the Forget button.
    • Close the Settings window, and connect like normal. If the access point still does not appear, try restarting your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.

If you are still unable to connect to a specific wireless access point, feel free to reach out to our support here - http://www.killernetworking.com/about/contact.

Router or Modem Issues With Killer 1535/1435

 

Router or Modem Issues With Killer 1535/1435

This article is intended to cover all issues that affect any access point, be it a router or modem, that occur when the Killer Wireless-AC 1535/1435 connects or is connected.

Update September 10 2018: If you have a TP-Link TL-WR841N, and are experiencing restarts when you connect to it with your Killer Wireless-AC 1435 or 1535, contact TP-Link support - https://www.tp-link.com -  for updated firmware which will resolve this issue. The latest published firmware may not resolve the issue, but multiple users have reported that TP-Link support is able to provide them with firmware that does not have this bug. 

The 1535/1435 is a cutting edge Wireless-AC device with MU-MIMO and Transmit Beamforming technology and, as such, not all access points have firmware already installed that is able to handle the connection. Problems that some of our users have reported include:

  • Access point restarts or crashes upon connection, requiring restart
  • Access point restarts or crashes after being connected for some time, requiring restart
  • Access point slows dramatically
  • Access point randomly disconnects all connected devices

The fix for this issue will depend on your personal situation.

 

 

You Own the Access Point

In this case, you are connecting to a device, such as a router, that you own, which is then connected to another device, such as a modem, which is owned by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If the device in question is a modem, please be sure that, even if you own the device, your ISP supports any firmware that you flash onto the modem. Most ISPs maintain a list of accepted firmware versions for each device online.

In many such situations, you can update the firmware of your device to resolve this issue. You should first try to update the firmware through the router's interface, if possible. If that is not a feature of that router, or if that does not solve the issue, check for the latest firmware from the official support page of your router. As of April 2018, reports of these issues have decreased significantly. It is possible that the routers listed below have all updated their regular branch firmware to include the fixes that will resolve your issue. If the problem is still not resolved, then see if your router is listed below. Listed below are the routers whose model numbers that we are aware of have issues, along with the location of the updated firmware that the router manufacturer has made available to address the issue:

If you own a different model than the one listed above, and updating to the latest firmware that is available from the support page of your router's manufacturer, we suggest contacting the support for your router, we suggest first updating to the latest Killer Control Center, found here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If that does not solve the issue, the next step would be to contact the support for your device and advise them of the steps that you have taken, and ask if they have a beta firmware available. At the same time, please contact our support, as well, using this form - http://www.killernetworking.com/about/contact

 

 

The Access Point is Owned By Your ISP

In this case, it is very possible that the device is running a very old firmware version. Most ISPs only update the firmware at the customer's request, or when it is absolutely necessary in order for the device to continue working on their network, and many ISPs use very old equipment. If you are connecting directly to an ISP owned device, and you are experiencing these issues, then your best bet would be to contact your ISP's support, and request that they update the firmware on the modem. This is usually a simple thing for them to do. If you are unable to resolve this by asking your ISP to update the firmware on the device, please let us know by contacting us here - http://www.killernetworking.com/about/contact - so that we may document the model of the access point that is not fully compatible with our device. In most cases, however, it is due to the age of the device, and a bug in its firmware. If asked, your ISP may be willing to change you to a different model of access point. You might also be able to provide your own access point (sometimes saving a monthly rental fee in the process), or buy your own router to plug into their modem, then use your router as the access point. If you decide to buy your own modem, most ISPs maintain a list of modems that work with their service. If you use multiple devices at the same time on the same access point, there is a good chance that you will see a boost in performance on all devices by providing your own modem. 

 

 

Addressing the Isssue with Drivers

There are some discussion threads where we have commented, linking to specific drivers on our site, where those drivers have now been moved, causing 404 errors, or redirections to this page. Those drivers were links to .INF drivers that could be installed using the Device Manager, to address specific access points crashing when the 1535 would connect to them. These posts and links were created before we had driver-only installers hosted on our website, and were generally just the latest driver-only file that we had available at that moment, as the problem was believed to be cause by the performance suite at the time. You can now download the latest driver-only installer here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/other-downloads. However, this will not always solve the issue, as the issue is sometimes not the performance suite, but that of buggy firmware with the access point. If you wish to try and address the issue by using a driver-only install, you will need to download the driver-only installer, then uninstall all "Killer" entries in your Programs and Features menu, restart your machine, then install the driver-only package. This will remove all Killer network management capability.

We have had some reports of users who were only able to keep their routers stable with only one very specific driver version - usually some Windows 8.1 driver used on a Windows 10 machine. In those cases, we will do our best to locate a copy of that specific version for you but, unfortunately for those cases, Windows Update will often update those drivers anyway, and that is completely out of our control. There are some guides out there on how to prevent Windows Update from updating your device drivers, but we have neither tested nor endorse any particular method of doing so, and we cannot say what the repercussions may be. 

 

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

Users have asked if the E2500, E2400, and E2200 can be used wirelessly. These are Ethernet adapters, so they cannot be used wirelessly. They require an Ethernet cable to be connected to your machine, and to an Internet gateway, such as a modem or router.

Your machine may also come with a wireless adapter, which may or may not be a Killer Networking adapter. If the wireless adapter is not a Killer Networking adapter, the Killer Control Center will report "No Killer Network Interfaces Connected" when you are connected to the Internet with only the non-Killer adapter. This is normal, as the Killer Control Center can only be used with Killer Networking adapters. 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

5.0 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

Users may encounter a situation where their Killer Wireless-AC adapter will not connect to their FIOS router on the 5 GHz Wi-Fi band. 

This seems to be due to the FIOS routers automatically choosing specific DFS channels that they may not fully support. There are a multitude of reports about this phenomenon around the web - where certain devices can connect to them while others cannot - but this post explains it fairly well - https://www.reddit.com/r/HomeNetworking/comments/2tu2so/why_some_devices_cant_see_the_verizon_fios_g1100s.

Fortunately, the fix is simple:

  1. Log in to your FIOS router's setup page. This page explains how to do so with some FIOS routers. It may not include all models. You may have to seek assistance from your ISP. https://www.howtogeek.com/197382/how-to-change-the-wi-fi-channel-on-your-verizon-fios-router/
  2. Change your router's 5 GHz channel. You can use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi analyzer to find which channel has the least traffic, but changing to any channel that is not a DFS channel should allow your devices to connect. Channels 36-48 and 149-165 are non-DFS channels in the United States. Your area may vary. You can reference this chart to find out which channels are DFS channels, and which are not, in your area of the world - - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#5_GHz_(802.11a/h/j/n/ac/ax)
  3. Restart your machine, if necessary, and see if the issue is resolved. 

Wi-Fi Channels 12 and 13

4.0 

Some users have reported problems seeing Wi-Fi access points that are using channels 12 or 13. This is a driver issue that will be corrected in later versions. In the meantime, there is a fairly simple registry tweak, which you can perform, that will enable your machine to see these channels. Note that this method has only been tested in Windows 10. If you have success using this method in Windows 7 or 8.1, please reach out to us at the contact information below and let us know!

  1. Click Start
  2. Type regedit and press Enter
  3. Copy the following, and paste it into the bar beneath File, Edit, View, Favorite, Help: 

    Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
     
  4. Then press Enter. It should jump to a point in the registry that looks like the below picture.
    Registry
  5. Each numbered folder within corresponds with a device on your machine. Unfortunately, from here, it's complete guesswork as to which folder equals which device. Fortunately, it's pretty obvious as you click on each folder. For instance, 0006 is my Killer 1525, as you can see in screenshot. If in doubt, look for the "DriverDesc" entry. They're in alphabetical order. But, again, it should be pretty obvious. If you see it talking about Bluetooth, it's the wrong one. Once you find it, you know where the registry portion for your Killer adapter is hiding. 
  6. On the right pane of the registry editor, find the entry marked "AddNewChannelfor11d". This is our holy grail of channels 12 and 13. It is currently set to a value of 0. Double-click it. Change the value to 1, and click the OK button.
  7. Click File then Exit
  8. You have now activated the adapter's ability to see channels 12 and 13. 

Killer xTend Compatibility

 

Killer xTend Compatilibilty 

Killer xTend is only available on specifically made mainboards that have three or more Killer network adapters integrated. The feature requires Windows 10 64-bit.

Wake on Bluetooth

 

In order to enable Wake-on-Bluetooth, you need connect the device that you wish to have wake the machine, and then:

  1. Right-click Start
  2. Click Device Manager
  3. Double-click Bluetooth
  4. Double-click the specific device, not the Bluetooth adapter.
  5. Click the Power Management tab
  6. Click Allow this device to wake the computer
  7. Click OK
  8. Close the Device Manager windows

That should allow your machine to Wake-on-Bluetooth. If the option to "Allow this device to wake the computer" is grayed out on the specific device, then you will need to check your Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapter power settings and make sure you do not have the computer set to turn off them off when it sleeps. You can find this under each of their respective Power Management tabs in Device Manager, using the above steps. The "Allow this device to wake the computer" will remain grayed out on the Bluetooth adapter itself, even when everything is working properly for your Bluetooth device to wake your computer. 

If these power settings are all correct, and the the option is still grayed out, then you may need to change a setting in your BIOS. It is also possible that your specific machine is not setup for Wake-on-Bluetooth. The hardware manufacturer does have to set things up correctly in order for this to work, and they do not always do this. You will need to refer to the support or manual for your machine or mainboard for further support. 

Chromecast Issues With Killer Wireless-AC 1550

 

Chromecast Issues With Killer Wireless-AC 1550

Some users may experience issues when casting to a Chromecast device with their Killer Wireless-AC 1550. These issues can be resolved by following these steps:

  1. Click Start
  2. Type cmd and right-click Command Prompt and click Run as administrator
  3. In the Command Prompt window, type netsh and press Enter
  4. Type interface and press Enter
  5. Type ipv4 and press Enter
  6. Type or copy and paste set subinterface "Wi-Fi" mtu=1458 store=persistent and press Enter
  7. Close the command prompt window and test

 

Bluetooth Stutter

1.0 

Bluetooth Stutter

Some users may notice that their machiens suffer from stuttering issues with Bluetooth devices. This may occur in the form of a jumpy Bluetooth mouse, or poor quality Bluetooth audio, or other Bluetooth issues. Some users have noted that the issue is worse when using thier wireless adapter, but this is not always the case.

Unfortunately, this is an issue that has been a hot button issue for Windows 10 since launch, and it has not been meaningfully addressed as of Windows 10 1803 (Spring 2018 Update). Some machines are affected more than others, but the issue boils down to Windows 10 handling DPC interrupts poorly. It is not network adapter, Bluetooth adapter, machine manufacturer, or Bluetooth device specific. Here are a few examples of some searches that highlight just how widespread and enduring this issue has been:

(Please note that we do not endorse the validity of any of the proposed fixes in these search results. These are merely provided to show the scope of the issue)

Windows 10 Bluetooth Stutter

Windows 10 Mouse Lag

Windows 10 Bluetooth Audio Choppy 

As you can see, all Windows 10 systems, devices, versions, and applications are affected. Until Microsoft fixes the issue with Windows 10, there are a few things that you can do with your specific system that may help. These are things that are just good ideas in general, but people have reported that they have also helped with this problem.

  • Make sure your machine's BIOS is up to date.
  • Make sure your machine's chipset drivers are up to date from the machine manufacturer's support page.
  • Update your Bluetooth and Wi-Fi adapter driver from the manufacturer (that would be us, if you have a Killer Wireless-adapter)
  • Download and install all other driver updates from the machine manufacturer, even if you don't recognize them. If they are not applicable, they will have no effect.
  • If your machine uses Intel and Nvidia graphics, try stripping the Intel driver by using this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/58-clean-install-any-driver - and then install only the latest package. 
  • If your machine uses Intel and Nvidia graphics, and you have your machine plugged into a wall outlet, try disabling the Intel graphics. This will cause a large drain on the battery, but may help with this issue.
  • Increase your graphics to maximum performance. This will increase battery usage. You will need to refer to the support for your graphics manufacturer (Nvidia, AMD, or Intel)
  • If you have an Intel CPU, download Intel's update manager from their website and check for updates. 
  • Avoid using Wireless-N 2.4 GHz, if possible, as it can directly interfere with Bluetooth.
  • Try changing the Wireless-N 2.4 GHz channel on  your router, even if you aren't using it, as it may have an affect.
  • If you have the option, disable your Wi-Fi adapter and use Ethernet. Wi-Fi adapters have high DPC latency by nature, so they contribute to the issue. 

Do you know of any fixes that have helped with this issue? Send us an email at killersupport@rivetnetworks.com and we will happily share the information!

 

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.