Clean Install Killer Control Center ** This Solves Many Killer Control Center Issues! Try This First If Unable To Update Or Install.**

4.3 

Clean Install The Killer Control Center

There have been many reports of issues with the Killer Control Center which can be resolved by performing a clean install of the Killer Control Center, as opposed to an update install, where the latest version is installed while an older version is in place. When troubleshooting, this is a good place to start. Here are the steps to perform a clean install of the Killer Control Center:

  1. If you are using Windows 10 and don't already know which build, find out which build of Windows that your machine is currently running. If your computer has completed the Windows 10 Spring 2018 update, you are running version 1803. Otherwise, or if you don't know, continue reading.
    1. Click Start
    2. Type winver and press Enter
    3. A box will appear with some information about Windows. There will be a 'Version" number. It will probably be either 1709 or 1803. 
  2. Download the correct installer for your version of Windows.
    1. Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 Version 1709 and below, or those using a Wireless-N device, should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
    2. Thos using Windows 10 Version 1803 and above should, and not using a Wireless-N adapter, should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd. This includes all Wireless-AC Wi-Fi adapters, which are labeled as "Wireless-n/a/ac." "Wireless-n/a/ac" indicates a Wireless-AC adapter, not a Wireless-N adapter. 
  3. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe
  4. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  5. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. It is not necessary to scan, and the scan may not find anything. Regardless, click Remove Killer Software, and give it some time to run. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED."
  6. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  7. Once your machine has booted back up, access  your temporary files folder and delete the contents
    1. Click Start
    2. Type %temp% and press Enter. Your temp folder should open.
    3. Delete all files in the temp folder. These are all temporary install files, and are safe to delete. If you receive a prompt saying that a file cannot be deleted, you can safely select Skip All
    4. Close the temp folder
  8. Run the installer that you downloaded for the Killer Control Center. Follow the prompts to complete the installation. 
  9. Restart your machine if the installer requested a restart.
  10. Test to see if the issue is resolved.

If you cannot install the latest Killer Control Center because you receive an error that says that the current package cannot be installed with one of our older packages, even after using this clean install guide, please see our guide for "Cannot Be Installed With" Errors. 

If you encounter any other issue with installing the latest Killer Control Center, click here for our guide for using the Microsoft Tool for issues that block a program from being installed. 

How Do I Use The Killer Prioritization Engine In The WRT32X/WRT32XB?

 

In order to use the Killer Prioritization Engine in the WRT32X, you must be using a PC with a Killer network adapter installed, running the latest Killer Control Center. Killer network adapters come preinstalled in many gaming laptops and mainboards, and are not available for sale separately, with the exception of the Killer Wireless-AC 1550. For more information on the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, please click here. 

Killer Networking adapters that can make use of the Killer Prioritization Engine in the WRT32X are:

  • All Killer Wireless-N Wi-Fi adapters
  • All Killer Wireless-AC Wi-Fi adapters
  • Killer E2200, E2400, and E2500 Gigabit Ethernet Adapters

The WRT32XB will automatically recognized XBOX devices, but they will not show as a Killer Enabled Device.

If you are not sure if you have a Killer Networking Adapter installed, you can find out by checking in your Device Manager. To do this: Right-click Start, click Device Manager, and double-click Network Adapters. If you do not see one of the above network adapters listed, then your machine cannot use the Killer Prioritization Engine in the WRT32X. 

If you would like to buy or build a machine with a Killer Networking adapter, here are the names to look for:

Machine manufacturers that use our adapters include: Alienware, ASRock, Clevo, Dell, Gigabyte, Lenovo, Sager, MSI, and Razer, and some smaller companies like HIDevolution, who takes others brands and customizes them.

Motherboard manufacturers that use our adapters include: ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI.

If you are looking for our tech, make sure you check which network adapters are being used, as these manufacturers do not all exclusively use our network adapters. You may have to look at various models.

Legacy Killer adapters such as the 2100, consoles, and other computers cannot use the Killer Prioritization Engine in the WRT32X, or the Killer Control Center, but they can be prioritized in the router's normal three tier interface.

For further support on other features of the WRT32X, please contact Linksys support. 

Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

5.0 

Wireless Not Working After Update / Code 10 Error

Some users have contacted us regarding their Killer Networking adapters not working after a Windows Update. This has affected various adapters, including the 1525, 1535, and 1550. Although we are as yet unsure exactly which update is causing this issue, there seems to be a connection with specific machine manufacturers having pushed an outdated version of the Killer Control Center through Windows Update, along with extremely outdated wireless drivers, which leads to a corrupted device driver.

The following troubleshooting steps should allow you to resolve the issue. 

  1. If your machine has Internet access through Ethernet, or if you are able to move files onto the machine using a USB thumb drive or some other medium, clean installing to the most recent version of the Killer Control Center and device drivers is the best way to resolve this issue. Click here for the guide on clean installing the latest Killer Control Center and device drivers. 
  2. (Code 10) If the clean install does not solve the issue, try manually installing the latest device drivers for your Killer Wireless device. This will hopefully replace the corrupted device driver. Click here for the guide to manually install drivers in Device Manager.
  3. If manually installing the driver does not resolve the issue, or if the network adapter is not present in Device Manager, try clean installing the drivers in Device Manager. This is different than clean installing the Killer Control Center or simply manually installing the drivers in Device Manager. This will hopefully remove the corrupted driver from the Windows Driver Store, allowing you to update to a working driver. Click here for our guide on clean installing drivers in Device Manager.
  4. If none of the above resolves the issue, then the issue may be due to something that is not strictly related to your wireless adapter or drivers, but is causing the adapter to malfunction. Check the support downloads page for your machine or motherboard manufacturer and make sure that you have the latest BIOS available, as well as the latest chipset drivers available. 
  5. If none of the above resolves your issue, you may need to uninstall whatever update caused the issue. Click here for our guide on uninstalling Windows Updates. Please note that this guide only refers to Microsoft Windows Updates specifically. It's possible that the update that caused the issue was not an update to Microsoft Windows, but an update to something else on your system. Keep that in mind if you find yourself manually uninstalling recent updates, which is otherwise covered in the linked guide. 
  6. If you have followed every step in this guide and still have not been able to establish wireless connectivity, try discharging your machine to reset the CMOS. Click here for our guide on discharging your machine. 
  7. If none of the above resolved the issue, then you may need to resort to resetting Windows. This may result in lost files and applications, so restoring a backup is preferable, if you have one available. Click here for Microsoft's information on resetting Windows and click "Reset your PC." Please be sure to read exactly what the reset will entail. Alternatively, you may find that other options on that page may better fit your needs. If you do go this route, make sure you install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers as soon as Windows updates to 1803 or later, before other updates can take place. This is best done using our clean install guide (click here). To find out which version of Windows is currently installed, click Start, type winver, and press Enter. Refer to the "Version" number. When resetting  your PC or reinstalling Windows, this number may change as Windows updates. As soon as the build is 1803 or newer, install the latest Killer Control Center and drivers using the clean install guide. 
  8. Unfortunately, if none of the above resolves your issue, your next step will be to contact your machine or motherboard manufacturer for RMA or repair options. When a wireless network adapter's driver is updated, the firmware on the chip is flashed. If none of the above solved the problem, then this indicates that the adapter is no longer capable of accepting a flash, and will need to be replaced. Alternatively, the machine or motherboard manufacturer may have an unpublished BIOS update or chipset driver that can resolve the issue. 

Priority Not Set Correctly For Game/Application

5.0 

Priority Not Set Correctly For Game/Application

Some users may find applications, games, or services whose priorities are not set correctly in the Killer Control Center. Although the Killer Control Center usually has the correct priorities preset for most applications, games, and services, there may be some that we have missed, and that the detection engine also does not find. 

If you find one of these, first make sure that you have the latest application priorities by clicking the Download Latest App Priorities in the Settings page of the Killer Control Center. This will ensure that you have the latest priorities that have been changed since the most recent version of the Killer Control Center was released.

If the priority for the application is not correct after updating, please send us an email to killersupport@rivetnetworks.com with the following subject - "KCC Priority." In the body of the email, please include the following:

  1. Application Name
  2. Application Executable (This can be found by hovering over the application in the Killer Control Panel, or looking in Task Manager under the Details tab. It will be a file that ends in .EXE. 
  3. Current Priority 
  4. Suggested Priority (1-6, remembering that, when using DoubleShot, Priority 6 uses Wi-Fi)

You can change the priority manually in the Killer Control Center by clicking the drop down box beside the application name, and selecting a number 1-6, with 6 being the lowest priority. 

"Cannot Be Installed With" Errors

 

"Cannot Be Installed With" Errors

Users may encounter the following errors, potentially among others, when attempting to update or install the Killer Control Center:

  • Killer Performance Driver Suite cannot be installed with Killer Ethernet Performance Suite (or similar) and you have already tried our Clean Install Guide.
  • Any other install errors where the current suite cannot be installed with another of our products, after you have tried our Clean Install Guide.

Even if you are in the process of updating the Killer Control Center, the issue is that the installer is encountering parts of an old Killer Performance Suite, and is unable to uninstall them. 

This issue can be resolved by following these steps:

  1. Download the latest Killer Control Center and keep it somewhere handy - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/22-update-killer-control-center
  2. Double-click the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. Let it fail. Do not restart your computer, even if asked. 
  3. Download Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/17588/fix-problems-that-block-programs-from-being-installed-or-removed 


    microsoft uninstall fixit2

  4. Once you have both of those things downloaded, uninstall all Killer products from your Apps and Features menu, which you can access by right-clicking Start.


    right click start uninstall killer

  5. You may encounter that same error and that is fine. When you do, skip that application, and uninstall any other applications from "Killer" including "Killer Drivers."

  6. Now run the tool from Microsoft. 

  7. For the first menu, you will simply click Next


    ms uninstall fixit 1

  8. Then after a moment of "Detecting Problems", it will ask if you are having a problem installing or uninstalling a program. Even if you are trying to update or install the Killer Control Center, the actual problem is happening when the installer attempts to uninstall the old suite, so you will choose Uninstalling


    ms uninstall fixit 2

  9. At the next prompt, the program will ask you to choose from a list of programs. Find the Killer-related program in the list. It may not be the same as the one in this screenshot, but choose whichever Killer suite the program finds, and then click the Next button. 


    ms uninstall fixit 3

  10. The tool will then proceed to erase the parts of the Killer suite that the installer was unable to remove from the registry. If the program is not listed, you have the option of choosing "Not Listed", and the tool may still find the pieces in the registry that need to be removed. However, it is hard to duplicate that particular scenario, so providing a screenshot is not possible, but it is fairly self-explanatory. 
  11. Once the tool has finished doing its work, you will want to restart your machine once more, and then install the latest Killer Control Center, which you downloaded previously.
  12. If  you are unable to fix the issue with this guide, try running through it again, but this time, choose Installing at step 7. This may help clear corrupted files that are not related to Killer components, but are still preventing the install.
  13. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact support at the link below! 

Wi-Fi or Bluetooth Missing

3.0 

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Missing

Update September 15 2018 - Windows 10 1809, which is currently being released in October 2018, seems to have caused many of these issues since its release. If you are unable to resolve this issue by following this knowledge base article, you may need to revert your operating system back to the Windows 10 1803 to restore functionality. While we do not yet have a guide for this, there are quite a few around the web, such as this excellent guide for rolling back to Windows 10 1803. 

Note: This guide can be used in the event of any M.2 device vanishing from the Device Manager. The procedure lists Killer devices specifically, but the phenomenon is widespread among M.2 devices and Windows 10, and these same steps can be used to restore functionality when any M.2 device disappears from Device Manager.

When this occurs, it is an issue of the BIOS or the operating system not enumerating the device properly. In very rare situations, it can be cause by some kind of physical trauma causing the device to become dislodged, or the device failing, but more often than not, the hardware is just fine. It’s just a matter of getting Windows or, sometimes, the BIOS, to see it again. Sometimes the device will be missing altogether, or sometimes it will be grayed out - the difference is only in whether your Device Manager is set to show devices that are no longer present in the machine. Either way, the Device Manager thinks that the device is gone, and that is what needs to be addressed.

Once you have resolved the issue and the device reappears in Device Manager, make sure you update the Killer Control Center and your device drivers by running the latest Killer Control Center installer, which you can find here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/. If you have any issues installing the latest Killer Control Center, you should be able to resolve them by clean instaling the Killer Control Center, following this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center.

  • If the issue is that your Bluetooth is missing, but your Wi-Fi device is still present in Device Manager, make sure that you do not have any USB devices disabled. The internal Bluetooth adapter is actually a USB device, so if there are any USB devices disabled in your Device Manager, for any reason, this can cause the Bluetooth device to vanish. If you are unable to enable the USB device, then you should resolve that issue first. This includes USB Hub devices, or any devices under the Universal Serial Bus controllers category in Device Manager that show any errors, for any reason. On some platforms, this is the #1 cause of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapters mysteriously vanishing from the Device Manager. Once you have resolved the USB issue, restart your machine, and check to see if the missing device has reappeared in your Device Manager. If you have recently plugged anything new into a USB port on your machine, unplug it and see if the error goes away in Device Manager. That USB device may be malfunctioning.  If there is nothing to remove, try these steps:
    • Right-click on the entry and click Enable, if applicable. If the only option is Disable, then the entry was already enabled.
    • Right-click on the entry with the error and click Update Driver > Search Automatically for Updated Driver.
    • Right-click on the entry with the error and click Uninstall Device > Uninstall, and then restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
    • Visit your machine or mainboard's support page and update your BIOS, chipset drivers, and USB drivers (if listed). 
    • Discharging the machine can also be helpful in clearing USB error codes. 

USB Error

Once you no longer have any disabled USB devices, the Bluetooth device should show back up. 

  • If you do not have any disabled USB devices, or any with errors, or if you have resolved that issue and the Wi-Fi or Bluetooth adapter has not reappeared in the Device Manager, then you will still need to update your chipset drivers, and possibly your machine or mainboard’s BIOS, if you haven't already. We have noted that some platforms have chipset drivers that are buggy enough that they absolutely will experience this issue if their chipset drivers are not updated. You will need to obtain these drivers from your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support download page. You can usually find this page by going to the main website for your machine or mainboard manufacturer and looking under "Support", or by using your preferred search engine to search for your specific model, then selecting the result that leads to your machine or mainboard manufacturer's website. Once you have found the support downloads page, if you cannot tell which drivers are the chipset drivers, it is generally recommended that you simply update all of the offered drivers, except for the Killer Network card drivers, which you should get from us, as they are likely more recent. If there is a BIOS update available, then updating the BIOS is also recommended, especially if the BIOS update notes mention anything that might pertain to this situation. Make certain that you at least update the chipset and USB drivers, if applicable. Some platforms combine the USB drivers into the chipset drivers, so you may not see a separate download. Once you have done these updates, restart the machine, and see if the missing device reappears in the Device Manager.
  • Depending on what is available, the best order in which to update is as follows:
    1. Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    2. Update your chipset drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    3. Update the USB drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page.  If none are listed, they are probably rolled into the chipset driver. 
    4. Update all other drivers available from your machine or mainboard's support page, except Killer Networking and Bluetooth drivers, which you should get from us.
    5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  • Windows itself can also play a part in the disappearing device. The Anniversary Update saw many such devices vanish, so much so that the Creator’s Update added a Bluetooth troubleshooter to Windows 10. Make sure that your Windows installation is up to date by using Windows Search to search Windows Update

    windows update

    then press Enter, and click Check for Updates

  • Once it has downloaded and installed everything it finds, restart the machine, and repeat this process until Windows Update finds no updates directly after restarting. Once this happens, check to see if the device has reappeared in the Device Manager. If this doesn’t help, and the issue is Bluetooth related, you can try troubleshooting using Windows built-in troubleshooter. Microsoft has instructions here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14169/windows-10-fix-bluetooth-problems-faq
  • Discharging the machine - If the device is still missing from the Device Manager, then that means that it isn’t the chipset drivers (or at least it isn’t only the chipset drivers) that is not properly enumerating the device, but rather the BIOS itself. In this case, you will need to discharge the machine to force the BIOS to re-enumerate all of its hardware (instructions below). Before you do this, make sure that you have updated the BIOS to the latest version, from the mainboard or machine manufacturer’s website, so that you address the flaw that caused this issue in the first place. Once that BIOS update is in place, and you have confirmed that the machine has booted back up, but the device is still not appearing in Device Manager, shut the machine back down, and unplug it from the wall. You will now need to fully discharge the machine.
    • If this is a desktop, you will need to remove the side panel, discharge yourself of static electricity on something metal (your computer’s case might work, or possibly your desk) and look for the CMOS battery. It is a large coin-cell battery. Remove that battery. Sometimes it’s easier with a flathead screwdriver, but it should be fairly simple to remove. Once you have removed that battery, press the power button on the machine 2-3 times to completely discharge it, then replace the CMOS battery and the case. If you are not comfortable doing this on your own, please refer to your mainboard or machine's support. 
    • If this is a laptop, hopefully it is one where you can easily remove the battery. This will be specific to your model of laptop, so you may need to refer to your owner’s manual, or your laptop’s support website. Some MSI models are held in with a single screw. If you are able to remove the laptop battery, do so, and then press the laptop’s power button a few times to fully discharge it.
    • If this is a laptop, but you are unable to remove the battery, or would prefer not to, you can discharge the machine through usage, instead. Unplug the laptop from the electric outlet, and temporarily change the power plan to a setting that does not allow it to sleep when the battery is low, then run the laptop until it discharges itself and will no longer power on. Once it has discharged itself, press the power button a few times to make sure it is fully discharged.
    • Once you have a fully discharged machine, put it back together, plug it back in, and let it boot in to Windows. You may see a message mentioning setting the BIOS to defaults, or something along those lines. This is nothing to be alarmed about – simply confirm that you want it set to defaults, unless you had set custom settings, in which case, you will need to re-set those custom settings. In the future, this message may be a warning that your CMOS or laptop battery is dead or on its last legs, but for now, we know that you discharged the machine on purpose, so we can safely ignore this warning. Once you are booted back in to Windows, check the Device Manager to make sure that the missing Wi-Fi or Bluetooth device is no longer missing.
  • In some very rare cases, the device may not show up because the machine was not fully discharged. We have had users report that they were able to repeat the steps to discharge their machines a second time, and have had success after that. Once the updates were in place, and the devices shows up, that is usually the end of the problem.

One final step that you can take, if you are willing and able to do so, is to physically reseat your Wi-Fi adapter. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device are on the same card, so there is only one adapter to reseat, and reseating this adapter only requires that you remove one screw, slide it out of the slot, then slide it back in and screw it back down, being careful not to dislodge or damage the attached antenna leads. However, the difficulty in getting to this adapter and performing this step will vary depending on your machine or mainboard, and your level of expertise. You may wish to consult with your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support at this point. If you have followed all of the other steps, and the device still has not reappeared, the device, or the mainboard, may also be physically damaged, and in need of repair, which would also necessitate contacting your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support for RMA or repair options.  

No Internet Access When Connected (Ethernet AND Wi-Fi)

5.0 

No Internet Access When Connected

Some users may encounter an issue where they are unable to use the Internet even though they appear to be connected through either Wi-Fi or Ethernet. Restarting the computer will usually fix the problem temporarily. 

This has been confirmed to be an issue with Windows 10 which has surfaced with recent updates. These recent updates have removed entries from the Windows 10 registry which instructed the operating system to release used ports when all ports are exhausted. This has the effect of being connected to an Internet connection without the operating system having the ability to open new ports. Applications and services which were already connected may still continue to function, while the user will be unable to browse the Internet, or connect to anything else. 

We have confirmed that this can be resolved by replacing these registry entries. Here is a step-by-step guide:

  1. Click Start
  2. Type regedit and press Enter
  3. Click File > Export... and then save the file to a place you will remember. This is your backup. If anything goes wrong, you can double-click this file from your machine and it will restore your current registry settings. The export may take a moment.
  4. Once the export is finished, copy this line - HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters - and paste it into the white space directly below File - Edit - etc, and press Enter. This should navigate you to the correct location in the registry, as seen below (right-click on the image and open image in new tab to expand):
    Ports Registry Fix
    Ports Registry Fix
  5. With Parameters remaining highlighted on the left side, right-click the empty white space on the right and click New > DWORD
  6. Name it TcpTimedWaitDelay and press Enter.
  7. Double-click TcpTimedWaitDelay and change the Value to 0000001e. Leave the Base setting as Hex. It should look like teh below screenshot.
    Ports Registry Fix Entry
    Ports Registry Fix Entry
  8. Click OK.
  9. Repeat steps 6-8, creating the following keys - 

    MaxUserPort 
    REG_DWORD: 0000fffe (hex)

    TcpNumConnections 
    REG_DWORD: 00fffffe (hex) 

    TcpMaxDataRetransmissions 
    REG_DWORD: 00000005 (hex)
  10. Click File > Exit
  11. Restart by clicking Start > Power > Restart and test.

Where Can I Buy Killer Networking Adapters?

3.8 

Where Can I Buy A Killer Networking Adapter?

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is currently available for sale here on Amazon. This is the only networking adapter that we currently offer for sale as an individual product. 

This is an M.2 Wi-Fi solution, and is the only Killer Networking adapter that is officially for sale individually. It uses IPEX -MHF4 antenna receptacles, which are commonly found on M.2 Wi-Fi adapters. Physically, it is a direct swap for the Killer Wireless-AC 1435, 1525, and 1535, as well as numerous Intel adapters. However, before ordering and attempting to install, we suggest you verify the following:

At this time, the adapter only ships to the United States. We are currently working toward shipping to the United Kingdom, but do not have a current timeframe. There are also other resellers that are also reselling the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, often to International buyers. 

Unfortunately, our current line of Ethernet adapters are currently only integrated into motherboards and laptops of various manufacturers and not sold as individual units. This is due to different regulatory and system calibration requirements. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are interested in buying or building a computer with our Ethernet or Wireless built in, here are the brands to look for:

Machine manufacturers that use our adapters include: Alienware, ASRock, Clevo, Dell, Gigabyte, Lenovo, Sager, MSI, and Razer, and some smaller companies like HIDevolution, who takes others brands and customizes them.

Motherboard manufacturers that use our adapters include: ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI.

If you are looking for our tech, make sure you check which network adapters are being used, as these manufacturers do not all exclusively use our network adapters. You may have to look at various models.

You may find that our other wireless adapters do show up online for sale from time to time. These are not authorized for resale by us, or any authorized manufacturer, but are being sold as components removed from other machines. Be sure to keep that in mind when purchasing. We can only support adapters that are obtained in this fashion in a very limited capacity.

Also note that many laptop manufacturers use hardware IDs to lock out non-authorized Wi-Fi adapters, so swapping in another adapter may not be as simple as it seems. Be sure to check with your machine's technical support or documentation before buying a different adapter.

 

Will The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 Work In My Laptop?

4.0 

Will The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 Work In My Laptop?

Many users have emailed us asking if the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 will fit in their laptop. (Click here to find out if the 1550 will fit your desktop.) Although we cannot know the exact specifications of each make and model of laptop, even if we have the model numbers for said laptops, we can give you some basic guidelines.

Look Up The Wireless Adapter That Your Machine Is Currently Using To See If It Uses A PCIe Half Mini Adapter, or An M.2 Adapter

To do this, right-click Start, click Device Manager, then double-click Network Adapters. You should find a wireless adapter listed there. Comparing to that adapter is the easiest way to know what will work in your system.

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is an M.2 adapter which uses IPEX-MHF4 antenna receptacles.

If your machine is using a Killer Wireless-AC 1525, 1435, or 1535, then the 1550 will almost certainly work as a replacement/upgrade. Please see manufacturer caveats below. 

If your machine is using a Killer Wireless-N 1102, 1103, or 1202, it will definitely not work as a replacement/upgrade, as these are PCIe Half Mini adapters. 

If your machine is using another brand's wireless adapter, you will need to find out if that adapter is an M.2 adapter that uses IPEX-MHF4 antenna receptacles. If it is not an M.2 adapter, then the 1550 will not work in its place. If the antennas are different, then the antenna leads will not fit onto the 1550 without modification, which may include cutting and splicing wires.Official websites are good sources of information, but you can also find information on shopping websites, such as Amazon and eBay, as resellers have a vested interest in providing accurate information about the product they are selling. Just make sure to verify with a few listings. For 100% verification, you will need to contact the machine manufacturer to find out what interface and antenna conections it uses for Wi-Fi. 

You can also open the machine up to verify whether the machine uses an M.2 slot for its Wi-Fi adapters. Below is an image comparing a PCIe Half Mini and an M.2 adapter, the two most common formats with modern Wi-Fi adapters.:

Manufacturer Caveats

There are two other things that need to be verified before you know for sure if switching Wi-Fi adapters is an option. Only the machine manufacturer or, potentially, their support community, can tell you these things.

  • Does the machine employ Wi-Fi lockouts? Some machine manufacturers have lockouts, which are built into the BIOS, that will either prevent the machine from booting, or prevent the wireless adapter from working, if an adapter other than the original is used. 
  • Is the Wi-Fi adapter soldered in? Some machine manufacturers solder down the Wi-Fi adapter. In these machines, even though they are using a normal slot for the Wi-Fi adapter, the adapter cannot be removed.

Other Considerations

  • Linux Support - The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 uses the iwlwifi driver, which is widely supported in nearly every Linux distribution. However, only the latest versions of this driver contain the hardware ID for the 1550, so only the latest Linux kernels support the 1550. Without the advanced Linux expertise required to patch the driver and rebuild the kernel, Linux support is still limited. 
  • Windows Support - The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is not supported in Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. It is only supported in Windows 10. The Wireless xTend feature is only supported in Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update). 

Killer Control Center Does Not Automatically Start

3.1 

Killer Control Center Does Not Automatically Start

Due to the wishes of our hardware partners, the UWD version of the Killer Control Center does not start automatically. 

It is not necessary for the Killer Control Center to load in order for our software to do its job so long as the Killer Network Service is loaded. The Killer Control Center is your user interface for the Killer Network Service. The Killer Network Service is what does all the work, reducing latency and prioritizing applications. By default, the Killer Network Service automatically loads with Windows. There is nothing wrong with leaving the Killer Control Center unloaded until you wish to use its interface, or change application priorities. However, if you would like to set the Killer Control Center to start automatically, you can do so by following these steps:

  1. ​​Right-click Start
  2. Click ​Run
  3. ​Type ​shell:startup​ and press Enter
  4. Move the Startup window to the right side of your screen
  5. Click Start
  6. Locate the Killer Control Center Icon in your Windows Start Menu, under K. 
  7. Click and drag the Killer Control Center icon over to the Startup window
  8. Right-click the Killer Control Center shortcut that you have created in the Startup window and click ​Properties
  9. Click the drop-down box beside "Run" and change it to ​Minimized
  10. Click Apply
  11. Click OK
  12. Close the Startup window

The Killer Control Center will now run at startup, in the background, on your next restart  If you have other applications loaded, it should run without stealing focus, but it will still load as a full-size window. You can switch to that window and click the X to minimize it to the tray, or you can leave it maximized in the background for quick access to its user interface. Unfortunately, we have found that Windows does not allow UWD applications to load fully minimized to tray.

No Killer Network Interfaces Connected

 

A few things can cause the Killer Control Center to report error. Following are the most common, and how to correct the issue:

  • You are connecting to the Internet using a network adapter other than a Killer product. Some machines ship with network adapters from multiple vendors. For example, your machine may have a Killer Ethernet adapter, but the wireless adapter may be from a different manufacturer, such as Intel. The Killer Control Center will not work with another brand's networking adapter. Be sure that you are connecting to the Internet using the Killer network adapter. Our performance suites only work connected to the Internet with our products. If your Ethernet adapter is a Killer Networking adapter, and your wireless adapter is not, then you will need to use an Ethernet cable to use the Killer Control Center. You can check to see which adapters you have installed by right-clicking Start, then clicking Device Manager, then double-clicking Network Adapters. If the only Killer Network adapter is listed as an Ethernet adapter, then you will need to use an Ethernet cable to use the Killer Control Center.
  • You are using an older version of the Killer Control Center. Some recent versions of the Killer Control Center experienced issues identifying some adapters. This has been resolved in current versions of the suite. Updating to the latest suite should resolve the issue. Even if you have a new machine, the version of the software that was installed on it when it was boxed may now be out of date. You can find the latest Killer Control Center here - https://www.killernetworking.com/killersupport/.
  • You are not connected to the Internet. You will receive this error if you are not connected to the Internet using a Killer Networking adapter. Note that if you are connected to the Internet using a virtual adapter of any kind, even if that virtual adapter is attached to a Killer Networking adapter, the Killer Control Center will show this message as it cannot work with a virtual adapter. 
  • You recently installed or updated the Killer Control Center and have not rebooted your computer. Rebooting should resolve the issue. Please note that, to restart, you should click Start > Power > Restart, as simply closing the lid, or pressing the power button on many modern computers activates sleep mode, and does not actually power down the machine. 
  • You are using a virtual network adapter. The Killer Control Center can only work if you are connecting to the Internet using a Killer Networking Adapter. If you are connecting to the Internet using a virtual adapter, the Killer Control Center will not work, and will show this message instead. 

If you are seeing this message and none of the above applies, please try clean installing the Killer Control Center. You can find instructions for that here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center

Error 1923 Verify That You Have Sufficient Privileges and Error 1939

4.7 

Error 1923 Verify That You Have Sufficient Privileges and Error 1939

Some users may encounter the error Error 1923: Verify that you have sufficient privileges to install system services and/or Error 1939 when they attempt to update or install the Killer Control Center. This is caused by the installer not being able to remove the previous version of the service. This appears to be due to the moving of files by the Spring 2018 Windows Features Update. There were also some updates that were incorrectly pushed through Windows Update that have resulted in the Killer Control Center being left in this state. In order to resolve this issue, you will need to uninstall the old version of the Killer Control Center, remove the service, and then run the installer again. We have developed a new tool, which will quickly and easily remove all old versions of our performance suite, as well as all old versions of our service from your system. 

A few notes about the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool:

  • This is not the Killer Remover tool that you might find elsewhere on the web and in this knowledge base. This is a brand new tool that we have just recently developed due to this issue. The old Killer Remover tool is not capable of resolving this issue, as it only targets pieces of installs that were broken by Windows Feature Updates prior to the 2017 Fall Creator's Update. 
  • This tool does not remove device drivers, other than what would normally be removed when running the uninstaller for the suite that you have currently installed. This tool primarily removes the Killer Performance Suite, and its attachments to Windows Update. 

Here are the steps to correct the Error 1923, Error 1939, or any other issue where Windows Update has put your machine in a state where you cannot install the Killer Control Center:

  1. Click here to download the latest Killer Control Center installer from our website. 
  2. Click here to download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool 
  3. Double-click the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool to run it.
  4. Click the Remove Killer Software button. This process may take some time.
  5. When the tool has finished removing everything, it will prompt you to restart your machine. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
  6. Double-click the Killer Control Center installer and follow the prompts to install. 

Please note - some machines will stil show pending Windows Updates with "Killer" and/or "Rivet" in them. Now that you have removed the previous install, and installed the website version, these updates now refer to software that is not present on your system. They should either attempt to install, fail, and no longer show as "pending," or simply be removed from the list of pending updates. If these updates cause issues after you have installed the Killer Control Center from our website, please let us know!

If you have any further issues, please feel free to contact support directly by clicking Contact Support under Support at the top of the page!

 

Killer Control Center High CPU Usage 

 

Killer Control Center High CPU Usage 

Some users have experienced high CPU usage by the Killer Control Center, often with the inability to update or effectively uninstall the Killer Control Center. This usually happens due to older versions of the software running on the latest version of Windows 10. 

First, if your machine is running very slowly due to the high CPU usage, you will want to disable the service. To do this:

  1. Click Start
  2. Type services.msc and press Enter
  3. Scroll until you find "Killer Network Service" or "Rivet Bandwidth Control." Once you find it, double click it.
  4. Click Stop. It may take a few moments for the service to stop. 
  5. Click OK and close the Services window. 

Your machine should now be more reactive while you uninstall the old version of the suite, and reinstall the latest.

  1. If you are using Windows 10 and don't already know which build, find out which build of Windows that your machine is currently running. If your computer has completed the Windows 10 Spring 2018 update, you are running version 1803. Otherwise, or if you don't know, continue reading.
    1. Click Start
    2. Type winver and press Enter
    3. A box will appear with some information about Windows. There will be a 'Version" number. It will probably be either 1709 or 1803. 
  2. Download the correct installer for your version of Windows.
    1. Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 Version 1709 and below, as well as those using Wireless-N adapters, should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
    2. Windows 10 Version 1803 and above should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd
  3. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. It is not necessary to scan, and the scan may not find anything. Regardless, click Remove Killer Software, and give it some time to run. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED."
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has booted back up, access  your temporary files folder and delete the contents
    1. Click Start
    2. Type %temp% and press Enter. Your temp folder should open.
    3. Delete all files in the temp folder. These are all temporary install files, and are safe to delete. If you receive a prompt saying that a file cannot be deleted, you can safely select Skip All
    4. Close the temp folder
  7. Run the installer that you downloaded for the Killer Control Center. Follow the prompts to complete the installation. 
  8. Restart your machine if the installer requested a restart.
  9. Test to see if the issue is resolved.

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

4.3 

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

You may find that your Ethernet speed is capped at 100 Mbps when your Internet Service Provider, or your internal network connection, should be providing speeds greater than 100 Mbps. If this is the case, you may be encountering a link speed issue. To check for this, check the link speed on the machine in question by following these steps:

  • Search Control Panel with Windows Search and press Enter
  • Click Network and Internet
  • Click View network status and tasks which will be underneath Network and Sharing Center
  • Click the connection that represents the Ethernet connection to your router or modem. You should see a screen that looks something like this.

link speed

Notice that the link "Speed" here reads as 100 Mbps. This means that the negotiated connection speed between the Ethernet adapter and whatever device it is plugged into is 100 Mbps. When everything is working correctly, this speed will read as 1.0 Gbps.

The only setting that is of concern for a Gigabit connection is that the adapter is set to Auto-Negotiate. From the Device Manager, you can check to see that the Killer adapter is set on Auto-Negotiate. This option is under the Advanced tab of the adapter's properties, in Speed & Duplex - right-click the adapter and choose properties, click the Advanced tab, and click Speed & Duplex, and make sure it is set to Auto-Negotiate. This is the default setting. We have had reports of some ISP technicians telling their customers that a Gigabit option will appear in this setting if the network adapter is working correctly. This is incorrect. Auto-Negotiate is the correct setting for Gigabit speeds in Speed & Duplex for Killer Networking Adapters.

If this is set correctly and your link speed still reads as 100 Mbps, then the issue could be a few things, although it is important to note up front that this is almost always an issue with an Ethernet cable.

Before troubleshooting any further, check the connection of the Ethernet cable into every piece of networking equipment, as well as your computer. Make sure each cable is labeled Cat 6 or Cat7. Unplug each Ethernet cable and plug it back in. Make sure that your cable is pressed firmly into the Ethernet jack. You should hear and feel a very audible click sound when the cable is in place. If you do not feel and hear this, then this cable should be considered broken, and you need to replace it. 

Even if you firmly believe that your Ethernet cabling is perfectly fine, and even if this cabling worked fine before, swapping it out for another, proven cable, or a brand new Cat 6 cable, will almost certainly solve the issue with the minimum of troubleshooting and headache. This is a very, very common occurrence when troubleshooting Gigabit Ethernet, and it nearly always comes down to one cable being the culprit. Note that this includes all cabling between the machine and the router, including any cabling in before and after any switches, or on the other side of any wall jacks, and behind the wall. However, if you were getting Gigabit using a particular setup and suddenly, with no changes whatsoever, your link speed is now 100 Mbps, then it's probably only one cable that is now having issues, and it is likely one that is exposed.

The fastest way to rule out any problems with anything other than cabling is to connect your machine directly into your modem with a single, proven Cat 6 or better Ethernet cable, and preferably into a proven Gigabit capable port, then check the link speed. If the link speed shows as 1.0 Gbps, then you know that the problem is somewhere in what you have just bypassed. Using this method of troubleshooting can be a pain if you are not dealing with a laptop, but it might still be worth doing if you have to decide if you need to call a contractor out to look at wiring behind your walls. Note that very long Ethernet cords are available for purchase, with lengths of over 200 feet or 60 meters, are available, so if you are involved in a prolonged debate with a technician over link speeds, this might be the simplest way to provide a temporary, single cable connection from your machine to the modem. 

That said, all adapters are different and handle shorts or issues with cables or ports differently, but a Gigabit adapter reporting as 100 Mbps is almost certainly a physical issue with the networking equipment.

You can troubleshoot this by trying different combinations:

  • If you cannot connect your machine to the modem with a single, proven Cat 6 cable, maybe you can connect a machine whose link speed currently shows as 1 Gbps to the Ethernet cable that is currently plugged into the problem machine. If this second machine now shows a link speed of 100 Mbps, this also proves that the issue is somewhere in the cabling or equipment between the machine and the access point, not with the machine itself. 
  • Power cycle (unplug and plug back in) your access point (hub, switch, router) and any other device between your machine and the access point.
  • Cat 6 is preferred to Cat 5e as, although the latter is technically capable of gigabit connections, it lacks any redundancies in grounding, which is an extremely common point of failure in network cables. Cat 6 remedies this issue, and making sure that all of your cabling is Cat 6 or better is usually a surefire way to achieve a gigabit connection. 
  • A "failed" Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable will usually still work at 100 Mbps. It doesn't take much physical trauma for a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps, and many of the cheaper ones don't support 1 Gbps out of the bag, even though they will be labeled as supported 1 Gbps connections. If you have only tried a Cat 5e cable, you owe it to yourself to try a Cat 6 cable. This is almost certainly the issue. If you are having issues achieving Gigabit speeds and you have Cat 5e cables in the mix then it is safe to assume that those specific Cat 5e cables are not Gigabit capable. This is common. Incidents such as rolling over the cable with an office chair, or stepping on it, or closing a door on it, can all cause a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps link speeds when it was previously working at Gigabit speeds.
  • Try different ports on your access point (hub, switch, router). If possible, use a port that is proven capable of working at Gigabit speeds with another machine. 
  • If all of these fail, then likely the Ethernet connector on the mainboard has an issue and you would need to check with your PC manufacturer (or mainboard manufacturer, if you assembled the machine yourself) on what your warranty or RMA options are. You may want to perform a physical inspection on the Ethernet jack's pins to make sure that none of them are bent or otherwise damaged. It is worth stressing once more, though, that this issue is nearly always one with the cabling somewhere between the Ethernet jack on your machine, and the Ethernet jack for the modem.

E2100, 2100, Xeno Pro, K1, and M1 (Legacy Devices)

5.0 

The E2100, 2100, and Xeno Pro are legacy devices, and no longer receive updated device drivers. Please contact the manufacturer of your Killer 2100, Killer E2100, or Xeno Pro for the latest drivers. The same driver (either 32bit or 64bit) works for each product. It has been confirmed that the latest drivers for Killer 2100, Killer E2100, or Xeno Pro can be downloaded on VisionTek’s support page at: https://www.visiontek.com/support/download-drivers.html. If you are using Windows 10, and Windows does not automatically install drivers for the device, the Windows 8.1 drivers should work for your application.

There is no Windows 10 driver for the E2100, 2100 and Xeno Pro, and there will be no further driver development.

Support is no longer available for the Killer M1 and Killer K1. 

Enabling Wake-on-LAN

 

Enabling Wake-on-LAN

Wake-on-LAN requires various other settings to be set properly. Your firewall and antivirus programs must be setup properly, as must your router, your machine's BIOS, and your operating system. As far as the driver settings go, ensure that you have the following set:

  1. In Device Manager > your Ethernet Adapter > the Advanced Tab
    1. Shutdown Wake Up set to Enabled
    2. Wake on Pattern Match set to Enabled (depending on your setup, Wake-on-LAN may work with this disabled)
    3. Wake on Magic Packet set to Enabled (depending on your setup, Wake-on-LAN may work with this disabled)
    4. SWOI set to Enabled (this is optional, and enables certain applications to wake the machine from external IP addresses over the Internet. This should not be needed for Wake-on-LAN, but may be desirable for some.)
  2. In Device Manager > your Ethernet Adapter > Power Management
    1. Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power should NOT be checked.
    2. Allow this device to wake the computer should be checked.
    3. Only allow a magic packet to wake the computer should only be checked if the computer wakes from sleep at undesired times, and you want to restrict this behavior to only waking from magic packet.

Please note that, with modern Dell and Alienware machines, the Power Management options will be grayed out. This is because these machines use Modern Standby. With Modern Standby, the machine is always connected to the Internet in every sleep state. However, Modern Standby does have its own set of wake sources. You can read more about Modern Standby wake sources by clicking here. 

If those settings are all set properly, then the network adapter is ready to go for Wake-on-LAN. Note that the machines have to be on the same subnet, and Wake-on-LAN may not be possible if there is any separation between the devices, other than a single router.

KCC Version Does Not Match Installer Version Number

 

Installer (UWD) Version Does Not Match KCC Version

Some users have expressed confusion in that the current version of the installer does not install a version of the Killer Control Center by that same number. The Killer Software Package and the UWD Killer Control Center will not share a version number. This is due to the Killer Software Package installing multiple items in order for the latest Killer Control Center to work correctly. The Killer Software Package:

  1. Installs the latest device drivers for whatever Killer devices you have installed in your machine.
  2. Installs the current Killer Network Service, which is what does all of the work reducing latency and prioritizing applications.
  3. Installs the extension drivers needed for Windows 10 to be able to download and run the current version of the Killer Control Center.
  4. Forwards you to the Windows Store to install the Killer Control Center.

As the drivers, the network service, and the Killer Control Center will all be different versions, the Killer Software Package must also have its own version number.

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.