Where Can I Buy Killer Networking Adapters?

3.8 

Where Can I Buy A Killer Networking Adapter?

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is currently available for sale here on Amazon. This is the only networking adapter that we currently offer for sale as an individual product. 

This is an M.2 Wi-Fi solution, and is the only Killer Networking adapter that is officially for sale individually. It uses IPEX -MHF4 antenna receptacles, which are commonly found on M.2 Wi-Fi adapters. Physically, it is a direct swap for the Killer Wireless-AC 1435, 1525, and 1535, as well as numerous Intel adapters. However, before ordering and attempting to install, we suggest you verify the following:

At this time, the adapter only ships to the United States. We are currently working toward shipping to the United Kingdom, but do not have a current timeframe. There are also other resellers that are also reselling the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, often to International buyers. 

Unfortunately, our current line of Ethernet adapters are currently only integrated into motherboards and laptops of various manufacturers and not sold as individual units. This is due to different regulatory and system calibration requirements. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are interested in buying or building a computer with our Ethernet or Wireless built in, here are the brands to look for:

Machine manufacturers that use our adapters include: Alienware, ASRock, Clevo, Dell, Gigabyte, Lenovo, Sager, MSI, and Razer, and some smaller companies like HIDevolution, who takes others brands and customizes them.

Motherboard manufacturers that use our adapters include: ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI.

If you are looking for our tech, make sure you check which network adapters are being used, as these manufacturers do not all exclusively use our network adapters. You may have to look at various models.

You may find that our other wireless adapters do show up online for sale from time to time. These are not authorized for resale by us, or any authorized manufacturer, but are being sold as components removed from other machines. Be sure to keep that in mind when purchasing. We can only support adapters that are obtained in this fashion in a very limited capacity.

Also note that many laptop manufacturers use hardware IDs to lock out non-authorized Wi-Fi adapters, so swapping in another adapter may not be as simple as it seems. Be sure to check with your machine's technical support or documentation before buying a different adapter.

 

How to Update or Install The Killer Control Center

 

Updating or Installing The Killer Control Center

The Killer Control Center installers contain drivers for the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500. The Killer Control Center can be installed on any system with one, or multiples of these network adapters.

Only the non-UWD version of the Killer Control Center that is downloaded from our website is compatible with our Wireless-N adapters - the Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103.

 The Killer Control Center cannot be installed on machines with the E2100, Xeno Pro, 2100, M1, or K1. These are legacy devices that are no longer supported, and no longer receive driver updates. 

Click here to jump to troubleshooting steps.

The first step in updating or installing the Killer Control Center is download the correct installer package. There are currently two different Killer Control Center installers:

Choosing the Correct Installer

Those using a Killer Wireless-N adapter, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and any older build of Windows 10 prior to 1803 (April 2018 Update) should use our website installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64

Those using Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update) or later should use the UWD installer, as long as they are not using a Wireless-N adapter - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd

Please note that the UWD installer is fully compatible with the E2200, E2400, E2500, Killer Wireless-AC 1525, 1435, 1535, 1550, and 1550i adapters, as well as all of our forthcoming adapters in 2018 and beyond.

Wireless xTend, a new feature of ours, is only compatible with the 1550, and will only appear if you use the UWD installer and have a 1550 installed.

If you are using Windows 10, and you are unsure which version you are running, you can find out by clicking Start, then typing winver and pressing Enter. A box will appear, which will give you information about Windows, including the version number. 

For more details on the differences between the two packages, please see this article - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/100-which-killer-control-center-should-i-install

Once you know which version to download, and have downloaded it, double-click the installer to install both the latest drivers for your Killer devices, and the latest version of the Killer Control Center. 

If all goes well, you can stop here. 

Errors or Other Issues When Installing

If you encounter any errors or problems when installing, first try uninstalling all versions of the Killer Software that are currently on your machine. We have developed a tool to make this very simple. Please follow the steps below:

  1. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe (please note that this is not the old Killer Remover tool - this is much more comprehensive)
  2. Make sure you have the installer for the Killer Control Center that you will be installing. Return here if you aren't sure. 
  3. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. There are two buttons - one for scanning, one for uninstalling. You do not have to scan. The scan might not find any software installations, but there may still be services installed on your machine that are preventing the installation of the current suite. Regardless of what the scan says, if you are having issues installing, make sure you click Remove Killer Software. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED"
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has completed restarting, run the installer for the Killer Control Center. 

If you are still unable to install the Killer Control Center, please try using Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed. You can find our guide for using this tool here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/90-microsoft-tool. This tool is very effective because, if you are still having problems by this point, the issue is very likely caused by files that have been shuffled around during a Windows Update. 

If the Microsoft Tool does not solve the issue, please submit a ticket to our support, along with an install log for us to analyze, by following these steps:

  1. Run the installer for the Killer Control Center one more time, so as to create the most recent possible information in the install log.
  2. After the installer fails, access your TEMP folder by clicking Start, then typing %TEMP%, then pressing Enter.
  3. Arrange the files in that folder by "Date Modified" so that the most recently modified files are at the top.
  4. You will see many files. Find the most recent file that begins with MSI and ends with .LOG. Move or copy that file to a place you will remember.
  5. Click Support > Contact Support at the top of our website, and be sure to click the folder and attach that .LOG file. In your ticket, please also mention any errors that you might have seen when attempting to install the Killer Control Center. 

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

4.3 

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

You may find that your Ethernet speed is capped at 100 Mbps when your Internet Service Provider, or your internal network connection, should be providing speeds greater than 100 Mbps. If this is the case, you may be encountering a link speed issue. To check for this, check the link speed on the machine in question by following these steps:

  • Search Control Panel with Windows Search and press Enter
  • Click Network and Internet
  • Click View network status and tasks which will be underneath Network and Sharing Center
  • Click the connection that represents the Ethernet connection to your router or modem. You should see a screen that looks something like this.

link speed

Notice that the link "Speed" here reads as 100 Mbps. This means that the negotiated connection speed between the Ethernet adapter and whatever device it is plugged into is 100 Mbps. When everything is working correctly, this speed will read as 1.0 Gbps.

The only setting that is of concern for a Gigabit connection is that the adapter is set to Auto-Negotiate. From the Device Manager, you can check to see that the Killer adapter is set on Auto-Negotiate. This option is under the Advanced tab of the adapter's properties, in Speed & Duplex - right-click the adapter and choose properties, click the Advanced tab, and click Speed & Duplex, and make sure it is set to Auto-Negotiate. This is the default setting. We have had reports of some ISP technicians telling their customers that a Gigabit option will appear in this setting if the network adapter is working correctly. This is incorrect. Auto-Negotiate is the correct setting for Gigabit speeds in Speed & Duplex for Killer Networking Adapters.

If this is set correctly and your link speed still reads as 100 Mbps, then the issue could be a few things, although it is important to note up front that this is almost always an issue with an Ethernet cable.

Before troubleshooting any further, check the connection of the Ethernet cable into every piece of networking equipment, as well as your computer. Make sure each cable is labeled Cat 6 or Cat7. Unplug each Ethernet cable and plug it back in. Make sure that your cable is pressed firmly into the Ethernet jack. You should hear and feel a very audible click sound when the cable is in place. If you do not feel and hear this, then this cable should be considered broken, and you need to replace it. 

Even if you firmly believe that your Ethernet cabling is perfectly fine, and even if this cabling worked fine before, swapping it out for another, proven cable, or a brand new Cat 6 cable, will almost certainly solve the issue with the minimum of troubleshooting and headache. This is a very, very common occurrence when troubleshooting Gigabit Ethernet, and it nearly always comes down to one cable being the culprit. Note that this includes all cabling between the machine and the router, including any cabling in before and after any switches, or on the other side of any wall jacks, and behind the wall. However, if you were getting Gigabit using a particular setup and suddenly, with no changes whatsoever, your link speed is now 100 Mbps, then it's probably only one cable that is now having issues, and it is likely one that is exposed.

The fastest way to rule out any problems with anything other than cabling is to connect your machine directly into your modem with a single, proven Cat 6 or better Ethernet cable, and preferably into a proven Gigabit capable port, then check the link speed. If the link speed shows as 1.0 Gbps, then you know that the problem is somewhere in what you have just bypassed. Using this method of troubleshooting can be a pain if you are not dealing with a laptop, but it might still be worth doing if you have to decide if you need to call a contractor out to look at wiring behind your walls. Note that very long Ethernet cords are available for purchase, with lengths of over 200 feet or 60 meters, are available, so if you are involved in a prolonged debate with a technician over link speeds, this might be the simplest way to provide a temporary, single cable connection from your machine to the modem. 

That said, all adapters are different and handle shorts or issues with cables or ports differently, but a Gigabit adapter reporting as 100 Mbps is almost certainly a physical issue with the networking equipment.

You can troubleshoot this by trying different combinations:

  • If you cannot connect your machine to the modem with a single, proven Cat 6 cable, maybe you can connect a machine whose link speed currently shows as 1 Gbps to the Ethernet cable that is currently plugged into the problem machine. If this second machine now shows a link speed of 100 Mbps, this also proves that the issue is somewhere in the cabling or equipment between the machine and the access point, not with the machine itself. 
  • Power cycle (unplug and plug back in) your access point (hub, switch, router) and any other device between your machine and the access point.
  • Cat 6 is preferred to Cat 5e as, although the latter is technically capable of gigabit connections, it lacks any redundancies in grounding, which is an extremely common point of failure in network cables. Cat 6 remedies this issue, and making sure that all of your cabling is Cat 6 or better is usually a surefire way to achieve a gigabit connection. 
  • A "failed" Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable will usually still work at 100 Mbps. It doesn't take much physical trauma for a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps, and many of the cheaper ones don't support 1 Gbps out of the bag, even though they will be labeled as supported 1 Gbps connections. If you have only tried a Cat 5e cable, you owe it to yourself to try a Cat 6 cable. This is almost certainly the issue. If you are having issues achieving Gigabit speeds and you have Cat 5e cables in the mix then it is safe to assume that those specific Cat 5e cables are not Gigabit capable. This is common. Incidents such as rolling over the cable with an office chair, or stepping on it, or closing a door on it, can all cause a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps link speeds when it was previously working at Gigabit speeds.
  • Try different ports on your access point (hub, switch, router). If possible, use a port that is proven capable of working at Gigabit speeds with another machine. 
  • If all of these fail, then likely the Ethernet connector on the mainboard has an issue and you would need to check with your PC manufacturer (or mainboard manufacturer, if you assembled the machine yourself) on what your warranty or RMA options are. You may want to perform a physical inspection on the Ethernet jack's pins to make sure that none of them are bent or otherwise damaged. It is worth stressing once more, though, that this issue is nearly always one with the cabling somewhere between the Ethernet jack on your machine, and the Ethernet jack for the modem.

Is VLAN (802.1Q) Supported With Killer Ethernet Adapters?

 

Is VLAN (802.1Q) Supported With Killer Ethernet Adapters?

Some users have asked if Killer Ethernet Adapters support VLANs and the 802.1Q standard.

Unfortunately, as Killer Ethernet adapters do not fully support VLAN tagging or the 802.1Q standard, they do not support most VLAN functionality. 

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

1.0 

"This Device Cannot Start (Code 10)" in Device Manager

code 10 device cannot start

We have seen many Code 10 errors lately from machines where Windows 10 has automatically updated the drivers from older versions. These errors do not mean that your adapter has actually failed. This is an issue with Windows 10, and getting the proper drivers installed will correct the issue. 

First, try updating to the latest Killer Control Center, which contains the latest suite and drivers. You can find that download here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64​. If you have any problems with the install, you can refer to our KB article on that subject here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software​.

If you have no way of getting drivers onto the machine (no USB thumb drive, no other means of connecting to the Internet with this machine) then click here to jump down to the alternate guide to fixing Code 10 errors.

If you have installed the latest Killer Control Center and restarted the machine, and that did not clear the Code 10 error, you can usually clear it by cleaning out the driver store. Here are the steps to clear out the driver store, and install the latest driver:

  1. Make sure you have the latest Killer Control Center installer handy on the machine (you may need to use a USB thumb drive or some other medium if you can't access the Internet with the machine). 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. You can hold off on restarting for now if an uninstaller says to do so.
  3. Close Apps and Features and right-click Start and click Device Manager
  4. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  5. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager. The adapter will probably reappear, and may or may not still show a Code 10, but I would suggest continuing with this guide either way.
  8. Repeat steps 4-7 until you no longer have the option to Delete the driver software for this device. Note that you could keep doing this indefinitely, as Windows will always install a default driver, but once you can no longer Delete the driver software for this device, you have accomplished the goal of clearing out all of the drivers that we were trying to clear out, and so you're done by that point.
  9. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. 
  10. Once the machine has restarted, run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If everything doesn't look perfect, restart the machine after the installation, even if the installer did not say to do so. 

 

 

The Alternate Guide to Fixing Code 10 Errors

This guide is only intended for use when you cannot get drivers onto the machine using a USB drive or an alternate means of Internet access, such as an installed Wi-Fi adapter.

  1. Close all other applications, as you will need to allow restarts as they are requested. If you regain connectivity after a restart, click here to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 
  2. Right-click Start, click Apps and Features, find all entries with "Killer" in the title, and uninstall them. This includes "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Suite" or any variations. If an installer requests a restart at any point, click to allow it to restart. 
  3. Once the machine has restarted, test to see if the issue is resolved. 
  4. If not, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Find the Ethernet adapter under the Network Adapters heading, right click it, and click Uninstall Device. If you cannot find it, you may need to click View > Show hidden devices at the top of Device Manager. It may also be listed somewhere other than under Network Adapters.
  6. Click Uninstall.
  7. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device if it is present.
  8. Restart the computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Do not rely on the machine's power button as many modern computers have that button set to sleep, not power off. Once the machine has restarted, check to see if the issue is resolved. 
  9. If not, repeat steps 4 - 8 until you regain Internet connectivity. Once you do, remember to go to step one on the guide above and proceed to clear the rest of the drivers in the driver store, as guided, and install the latest driver. This is very important as, otherwise, the "bad" driver will remain in the Windows driver store, and may cause issues in the future. 

If you have any further issues or questions, feel free to reach out to support at http://www.killernetworking.com/about/contact

Problems With The Killer Network Manager

 

The Killer Network Manager is our outgoing performance suite. It is no longer being updated, and does not contain the latest Ethernet or Wi-Fi drivers. We encourage all users of the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 to upgrade to the Killer Control Center, found here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. This includes users whose machines came with the Killer Network Manager preinstalled. There is no need to continue using the Killer Network Manager.

For a smooth installation, download the latest Killer Control Center installation package, then uninstall all Killer products from your Apps and Features menu, which is accessible by right-clicking Start, then restart your computer, and double-click the new installation package to install the new Killer Control Center.

The old Killer Network Manager suite is still available for download here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/e2200-e2400-wireless - but will no longer be updated, and may not be fully compatible with future Windows updates, antivirus suites, or other applications that manipulate network data.

How to Update or Install The Killer Network Manager

4.0 

Updating or Installing The Killer Network Manager

The Killer Network Manager is our outgoing performance suite. It is no longer being updated, and does not contain the latest Ethernet or Wi-Fi drivers. We encourage all users of the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 to upgrade to the Killer Control Center, found here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. This includes users whose machines came with the Killer Network Manager preinstalled. There is no need to continue using the Killer Network Manager. 

For a smooth installation, download the latest Killer Control Center installation package, then uninstall all Killer products from your Apps and Features menu, which is accessible by right-clicking Start, then restart your computer, and double-click the new installation package to install the new Killer Control Center.

If you have any further issues installing the Killer Control Center, or uninstalling the Killer Network Manager, please see this troubleshooting article - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software.

The old Killer Network Manager suite is still available for download here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/e2200-e2400-wireless - but will no longer be updated, and may not be fully compatible with future Windows updates, antivirus suites, or other applications that manipulate network data. 

Installing Drivers From .INF Package Through Device Manager

4.3 

Installing Drivers Using Device Manager

If you would like to install the Killer E2200, Killer E2400, Killer Wireless-N, or Killer Wireless-AC drivers without the Killer Performance Suite - you can do so using these steps. Note that this will disable all network prioritization features.

  1. Download the latest .INF package from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/other-downloads
  2. Extract the contens of the package to a location that you will remember.
  3. If you currently have the performance suite installed, you will want to uninstall it first by right-clicking Start, then clicking Apps and Features. Then uninstall all "Killer" labeled applications in this window, including anything labeled "suite" or "driver," and restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
  4. Once your computer is ready, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Locate the Killer Network Adapter in your Device Manager. If it has a driver already installed by Windows, it will be located by its name under Network Adapters. If it has no driver installed, it will be named Ethernet Controller or Unknown Device, as in the screenshot below.
  6. Right-click the adapter, and click Update Driver Software... or Update Driver, whichever is available. 
  7. Click Browse my computer for driver software. 



  8. Click Let me pick from a list of available drivers on my computer
  9. Click Have disk
  10. Click Browse
  11. Navigate to the location where you extracted the standalone driver package earlier. 
  12. From there, you will only have one option, which will be a folder called Production. Double-click that folder.
  13. Double-click your operating system.
  14. Double-click your network adapter.
    1. Eth for all Ethernet Adapters
    2. 11AC1525 for the 1525
    3. 11AC1550 for the 1550
    4. 11AC for the 1535/1435
    5. 11N for all Wireless-N adapters
  15. There will be only one file. Double-click it. 
  16. Click OK
  17. Select your exact model from the list and click Next

 

The final screen should show that you have successfully installed the driver. You can now click on Close.

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

 

Can the E2500/E2400/E2200 Be Used Wirelessly?

Users have asked if the E2500, E2400, and E2200 can be used wirelessly. These are Ethernet adapters, so they cannot be used wirelessly. They require an Ethernet cable to be connected to your machine, and to an Internet gateway, such as a modem or router.

Your machine may also come with a wireless adapter, which may or may not be a Killer Networking adapter. If the wireless adapter is not a Killer Networking adapter, the Killer Control Center will report "No Killer Network Interfaces Connected" when you are connected to the Internet with only the non-Killer adapter. This is normal, as the Killer Control Center can only be used with Killer Networking adapters. 

Do Killer Network Adapters Support Link Aggregation/NIC Teaming?

 

FAQ: Do Killer Network Adapters Support Link Aggregation/NIC Teaming?

Link Aggregation is not supported with any Windows consumer platform. In order to use Link Aggregation, you must be using an Enterprise grade router with this capability, and a Windows Server Operating System. However, the Killer Control Center is capable of using multiple Killer Network Adapters at one time with Doubleshot Pro and Doubleshot-X3 Pro which, for gaming, is even better than Link Aggregation, as the Killer Control Center can make use of Wi-Fi and Ethernet at the same time! You can read more about Killer Doubleshot Pro here - http://www.killernetworking.com/technology/killer-double-shot-pro and Killer Doubleshot-X3 Pro here - http://www.killernetworking.com/technology/killer-doubleshot-x3-pro.

 

Ethernet Adapter No Longer In Device Manager

1.0 

When a device goes missing from the Device Manager, it means that either the BIOS or the operating system is not enumerating the device for some reason. Check for another device in Device Manager that may be the Ethernet controller, but not labeled as such. It may be called "Unknown Device" or "Network Controller." If such a device exists, you can usually simply right-click on that device and click Update Driver and the problem will resolve itself from there.

If there is nothing at all indicating the existence of the Ethernet device, then the device may have been disbled in the BIOS. If you have recently made changes in the BIOS, then this would be worth checking. It's usually a fairly obvious setting, such as "Enable onboard LAN" that has been unchecked. If you have not changed anything in the BIOS, check to with your machine or mainboard manufacturer to make sure that you are using the most up to date version of the BIOS available. 

If you have ruled out the above, you may be able to uninstall and reinstall the drivers for the device by following these steps:

  1. Download the latest Killer Control Center installer from here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you do not have another adapter on that machine, you may need to use a USB drive, or some other method of moving the file onto the machine.
  2. Right-click Start and click Apps and Features
  3. Find any "Killer" entry and uninstall it, including "Killer Drivers" or "Killer Performance Suite" or any variation.
  4. Restart the machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  5. Once the machine has booted back up, right-click start and click Device Manager
  6. Click View and click Show hidden devices
  7. Hopefully the missing adapter will show up, albeit grayed out. Right click on it, and click Uninstall Device.
  8. Check the box for Delete the driver software for this device , if it exists, then click Uninstall.
  9. Click the light blue Scan for hardware changes icon at the top of Device Manager.
  10. If the adapter reppears, close the Device Manager and run the installer for the latest Killer Control Center. If it does not, restart the computer.

If the adapter still does not appear, then try updating all of the drivers available from your mainboard or machine manufacturer. The chipset driver is especially important. Uninstalling the most recent Windows Updates may also help, especially if the issue was first noticed after a Windows Update. Sometimes, uninstalling and reinstalling the Windows Update in question will result in a more successful outcome, with a working Ethernet adapter. 

If none of the above does the trick, you may need to perform a power drain on the machine in order to force it to re-enumerate the device. To do this, unplug the machine from the wall and then, if it is a laptop, remove the battery, if possible. If you cannot remove the battery, drain it through usage until the machine will no longer power on. If it is a desktop, you will need to remove the CMOS battery, which is a large button-style battery on the mainboard. Once there is no power to the machine, press and hold the power button for ten seconds, to complete the power drain. Then replace the battery, plug the machine back in, and power it on. The Ethernet device should now enumerate and, with the fixes that you put in place earlier, it should not vanish again.

 

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.