Clean Install Killer Control Center ** This Solves Many Killer Control Center Issues! Try This First If Unable To Update Or Install.**

3.6 

Clean Install The Killer Control Center

There have been many reports of issues with the Killer Control Center which can be resolved by performing a clean install of the Killer Control Center, as opposed to an update install, where the latest version is installed while an older version is in place. When troubleshooting, this is a good place to start. Here are the steps to perform a clean install of the Killer Control Center:

  1. If you are using Windows 10 and don't already know which build, find out which build of Windows that your machine is currently running. If your computer has completed the Windows 10 Spring 2018 update, you are running version 1803. Otherwise, or if you don't know, continue reading.
    1. Click Start
    2. Type winver and press Enter
    3. A box will appear with some information about Windows. There will be a 'Version" number. It will probably be either 1709 or 1803. 
  2. Download the correct installer for your version of Windows.
    1. Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 Version 1709 and below, or those using a Wireless-N device, should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
    2. Windows 10 Version 1803 and above should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd
  3. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe
  4. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  5. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. It is not necessary to scan, and the scan may not find anything. Regardless, click Remove Killer Software, and give it some time to run. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED."
  6. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  7. Once your machine has booted back up, access  your temporary files folder and delete the contents
    1. Click Start
    2. Type %temp% and press Enter. Your temp folder should open.
    3. Delete all files in the temp folder. These are all temporary install files, and are safe to delete. If you receive a prompt saying that a file cannot be deleted, you can safely select Skip All
    4. Close the temp folder
  8. Run the installer that you downloaded for the Killer Control Center. Follow the prompts to complete the installation. 
  9. Restart your machine if the installer requested a restart.
  10. Test to see if the issue is resolved.

Wi-Fi Drops and Disconnects

 

Wi-Fi Drops and Disconnects

Please note that this article is not meant to be followed step-by-step to completion. Instead, it's a list of suggestions that are known to be fixes for wireless drops and disconnects, with the most effective suggestions at the top. Once you find something that works, there is no need to read or implement the rest of this guide. 

Drops and disconnects are, unfortunately, still a part of using Wi-Fi Internet. They're frustrating, and they seem to happen at the worst, most annoying times, but with all of the different technology that has to come together to work correctly, it's surprising that Wi-Fi is generally very reliable! 

We want your Killer Wireless adapter to be the most reliable part of your Wi-Fi connection, so we have put together the steps that you can take, when you are encountering Wi-Fi drops, that are most likely to resolve the issue. Some of them are specific to our adapter, while some are more general. This is because, in our experience, most Wi-Fi disconnects are due more to the wireless environment than any specific wireless adapter. Here are the steps that our experience has shown are most likely to solve Wi-Fi disconnect issues:

  1. Update your Wi-Fi adapter's drivers to the latest available from our website. Click here for instructions on how to clean install the latest Killer Control Center that is appropriate for your Windows build. 
  2. Update your motherboard or machine's BIOS. This is especially true if you are using a laptop, as laptop manufacturer's are constantly releasing BIOS updates to address Wi-Fi issues. You can usually easily find the support downloads section for your specific machine or motherboard by using Google to search your machine's model number, followed by "downloads." Make sure you read the instructions before you flash the BIOS!
  3. Update your motherboard or machine's chipset drivers. These control resources within Windows. You can also find these on your support download page. If the manufacturer has not updated in a long time, you can also go straight to the chipset manufacturer (Intel or AMD) and get newer, but more generic chipset drivers. Your results may vary, with those.
  4. Reset your entire network and network stack using this guide - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/93-resetting-network-devices-and-network-stack. Even if you have done some of these things at various points, it's worth it to do all of them, in that order, to make sure everything is reset correctly.
  5. Make sure Windows install is completely updated by clicking Start, then type Update, click Check for Updates, click Check for Updates again, and let it install anything it finds. If it finds anything, restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart, then repeat the process. Do this until there are no updates just after a fresh restart. 
  6. If you are using any antivirus or firewall application, temporarily uninstall it, then restart your machine. Unfortunately, disabling these applications does not prevent them from manipulating network packets - they have to be temporarily uninstalled. If this resolves the issue, you may be able to simply reinstall the application using a freshly downloaded copy, and the disconnects may not return. If they do return, refer to the support team for that application. 
  7. Change your Wi-Fi adapter's power settings. You can find the step-by-step instructions for that here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/59-wi-fi-power-settings
  8. Check your Wi-Fi signal strength. You can see this in the Killer Control Center in the Wi-Fi Analyzer menu after clicking your Wi-Fi network (make sure to switch to 5 GHz if you are using a 5 GHz network, or 2.4 GHz if you are using a 2.4 GHz network). You will see "Signal Strength" appear at the bottom of the Killer Control Center. Anything below 80% and you are very likely to see drops and disconnects, especially when transferring large files or gaming. If the signal strength is below 80% when  you are in the same room as the access point, with clear line of sight between the laptop and the access point, then there is very likely something wrong with the machine's antennas. If you can't get 100% signal strength when within 5 feet of the wireless access point, then the issue is definitely an antenna issue. In this case, you will need to contact the machine manufacturer for repair or RMA options, unless you feel comfortable opening the machine and checking the antenna leads yourself. 
  9. Experiment with changing your Wi-Fi adapter's Device Manager settings. Try changing one setting at a time, then testing, to see if the change helped. To get to these, right-click Start, click Device Manager, double-click Network Adapters, double-click your wireless adapter, click the Advanced tab. Then, click the following settings in the "Property" box, and change their values in the "Value" box:
    1. Dynamic MIMO Power Save: Experiment with disabling 
    2. Preferred Band: If you know for certain that either 5 GHz (often Wireless-AC) or 2.4 GHz (often-Wireless-N) wireless signals should work better in your situation, you can try setting a preference here.
    3. Roaming Aggressiveness: This determines how quickly your wireless adapter will switch access points when there are multiple saved access points in range. If the aggressiveness is set too low, it is more likely to hang on to an access point with low signal strength, even if there is a better option available. If it is set too high, you will experience Wi-Fi drops if multiple nearby access points have similar signal strengths, as the adapter will switch between them often, disrupting the data flow. If you have multiple saved access points in range, this setting deserves tweaking and testing. 
    4. Wireless Mode: This dictates which types of wireless connections to which your adapter is allowed to connect. Generally speaking, this should be left to its highest available setting, such as 12 - 11 a/b/g/n/ac, which means the adapter will connect to Wireless-A, B, G, N, or Wireless-AC access points. However, some users have reported that, especially with older Wireless-N access points, restricting Wireless-AC adapters to 09 - 11 a/g/n has improved Wi-Fi reliability for them. If you are unlikely to encounter Wireless-AC access points and speeds, this is certainly worth exploring.  The only types of wireless connection that are currently in widespread use are Wireless N, AC, and, to a much lesser degree, Wireless-G. 
  10. If you are only experiencing problems with one network, and the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer shows that you have a signal strength of over 80, then the access point probably needs a firmware update.
    1. If this is your own home network, and you are using a router which you have purchased and connected to the modem that is provided by your Internet Service Provider, updating firmware is usually easily done. Refer to your specific router manufacturer’s instructions on doing this. If the router sports automatic firmware updating, don't trust it. Check the version that is loaded on the device against the current version available on the device's website. Very often, you'll find that you are not running the latest version, and that you will need to manually update.
    2. If this is your home network, and you are connecting wirelessly to the modem that is provided by your ISP, then you will need to contact your ISP and have them update your firmware. This is usually a quick click of a button and a small wait for their support team, but they will sometimes say that their modems update automatically. Ask them to please verify, by firmware version number, that your modem is using the most up-to-date firmware version. 
  11. One other thing you can try is the Windows Network Reset. This will reistall your adapter, and will reset many things that are not easily accessible otherwise. This will also reset all saved Wi-Fi networks, including their passwords, and will remove all associations with any virtual adapters. To use this, simply click Start, type Network Reset, click Network Reset, and follow the prompts until completion. 
  12. You should also investigate your wireless landscape. Many Wi-Fi drops and connection issues are due to radio conflicts. You can use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to determine which channels are least used on each band (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz) and change your Wi-Fi router's settings accordingly. Here are some tips on which settings to choose:

    1. On the 2.4 GHz band, always choose Channels 1, 11, or 6. Try to pick the emptiest of the three, using the Wi-Fi Analyzer as your guide. Channels other than 1, 11, or 6 will receive more interference. European users can also use Channels 12 and 13 on the 2.4 GHz band. If you are in Europe, and your Killer Wireless device cannot see networks on Channels 12 and 13, please see this guide - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/61-wi-fi-channels-12-and-13
    2. On the 5 GHz band, choose a channel that is as far away from other channels as possible. If you are experiencing Wi-Fi drops and you are using a DFS channel, (Channels 50-144 in the USA, other areas can be found on this chart), try changing to another 5 GHz channel and see if that improves the issue. 
    3. If you do have to share a channel, or if there are competing networks close to yours, set your sideband or side channel (the name of the setting will depend on your router manufacturer) to 20 MHz. This creates a tight, more powerful signal. Higher sidebands should only be considered if you have no Wi-Fi radio competition, but need the signal to get around solid objects. 
    4. If you have extenders, access points, or any other wireless routers, make sure they are operating on a different channel than your primary router. Even a single Wi-Fi router with multiple radios can conflict with itself if those radios are set to the same channel. 
    5. Do not depend on "auto" settings if you are experiencing problems. They are not always reliable, and will often switch to less desirable configurations.
    6. Consider that Wi-Fi is a line-of-sight radio technology. Each solid between the antenna of your wireless access point (router/modem) and your computer will diminish the signal. Repositioning things by inches can make a world of difference. 
    7. Try changing your channel width (some routers may call it sideband or side channel). This is another area where many routers are, by default, set to "auto", but don't do a very good job. The higher the channel width, the more data the stream can carry, making it potentially faster, and the more likely it is to get around solid objects. However, the signal will have overall less strength, and will be more prone to interference from other nearby channels. Depending your Wi-Fi landscape, it may be best to give up some channel width in order to get the extra strength and dodge interference, even if your router and adapter can handle higher channel widths.
      1. On the 5 GHz band, set the channel width to 40 MHz and see if that improves reliability. 
      2. On the 2.4 GHz band, set the channel width to 20 MHz and see if that improves reliability. 

If none of these solve the issue for you, please feel free to reach out to support by clicking Contact Support under Support at the top of the website.  

Where Can I Buy Killer Networking Adapters?

3.8 

Where Can I Buy A Killer Networking Adapter?

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is currently available for sale here on Amazon. This is the only networking adapter that we currently offer for sale as an individual product. 

This is an M.2 Wi-Fi solution, and is the only Killer Networking adapter that is officially for sale individually. It uses IPEX -MHF4 antenna receptacles, which are commonly found on M.2 Wi-Fi adapters. Physically, it is a direct swap for the Killer Wireless-AC 1435, 1525, and 1535, as well as numerous Intel adapters. However, before ordering and attempting to install, we suggest you verify the following:

At this time, the adapter only ships to the United States. We are currently working toward shipping to the United Kingdom, but do not have a current timeframe. There are also other resellers that are also reselling the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, often to International buyers. 

Unfortunately, our current line of Ethernet adapters are currently only integrated into motherboards and laptops of various manufacturers and not sold as individual units. This is due to different regulatory and system calibration requirements. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you are interested in buying or building a computer with our Ethernet or Wireless built in, here are the brands to look for:

Machine manufacturers that use our adapters include: Alienware, ASRock, Clevo, Dell, Gigabyte, Lenovo, Sager, MSI, and Razer, and some smaller companies like HIDevolution, who takes others brands and customizes them.

Motherboard manufacturers that use our adapters include: ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI.

If you are looking for our tech, make sure you check which network adapters are being used, as these manufacturers do not all exclusively use our network adapters. You may have to look at various models.

You may find that our other wireless adapters do show up online for sale from time to time. These are not authorized for resale by us, or any authorized manufacturer, but are being sold as components removed from other machines. Be sure to keep that in mind when purchasing. We can only support adapters that are obtained in this fashion in a very limited capacity.

Also note that many laptop manufacturers use hardware IDs to lock out non-authorized Wi-Fi adapters, so swapping in another adapter may not be as simple as it seems. Be sure to check with your machine's technical support or documentation before buying a different adapter.

 

Will The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 Work In My Laptop?

 

Will The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 Work In My Laptop?

Many users have emailed us asking if the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 will fit in their laptop. (Click here to find out if the 1550 will fit your desktop.) Although we cannot know the exact specifications of each make and model of laptop, even if we have the model numbers for said laptops, we can give you some basic guidelines.

Look Up The Wireless Adapter That Your Machine Is Currently Using To See If It Uses A PCIe Half Mini Adapter, or An M.2 Adapter

To do this, right-click Start, click Device Manager, then double-click Network Adapters. You should find a wireless adapter listed there. Comparing to that adapter is the easiest way to know what will work in your system.

The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is an M.2 adapter which uses IPEX-MHF4 antenna receptacles.

If your machine is using a Killer Wireless-AC 1525, 1435, or 1535, then the 1550 will almost certainly work as a replacement/upgrade. Please see manufacturer caveats below. 

If your machine is using a Killer Wireless-N 1102, 1103, or 1202, it will definitely not work as a replacement/upgrade, as these are PCIe Half Mini adapters. 

If your machine is using another brand's wireless adapter, you will need to find out if that adapter is an M.2 adapter that uses IPEX-MHF4 antenna receptacles. If it is not an M.2 adapter, then the 1550 will not work in its place. If the antennas are different, then the antenna leads will not fit onto the 1550 without modification, which may include cutting and splicing wires.Official websites are good sources of information, but you can also find information on shopping websites, such as Amazon and eBay, as resellers have a vested interest in providing accurate information about the product they are selling. Just make sure to verify with a few listings. For 100% verification, you will need to contact the machine manufacturer to find out what interface and antenna conections it uses for Wi-Fi. 

You can also open the machine up to verify whether the machine uses an M.2 slot for its Wi-Fi adapters. Below is an image comparing a PCIe Half Mini and an M.2 adapter, the two most common formats with modern Wi-Fi adapters.:

Manufacturer Caveats

There are two other things that need to be verified before you know for sure if switching Wi-Fi adapters is an option. Only the machine manufacturer or, potentially, their support community, can tell you these things.

  • Does the machine employ Wi-Fi lockouts? Some machine manufacturers have lockouts, which are built into the BIOS, that will either prevent the machine from booting, or prevent the wireless adapter from working, if an adapter other than the original is used. 
  • Is the Wi-Fi adapter soldered in? Some machine manufacturers solder down the Wi-Fi adapter. In these machines, even though they are using a normal slot for the Wi-Fi adapter, the adapter cannot be removed.

Other Considerations

  • Linux Support - The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 uses the iwlwifi driver, which is widely supported in nearly every Linux distribution. However, only the latest versions of this driver contain the hardware ID for the 1550, so only the latest Linux kernels support the 1550. Without the advanced Linux expertise required to patch the driver and rebuild the kernel, Linux support is still limited. 
  • Windows Support - The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is not supported in Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. It is only supported in Windows 10. The Wireless xTend feature is only supported in Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update). 

Killer Control Center Does Not Automatically Start

5.0 

Killer Control Center Does Not Automatically Start

Due to the wishes of our hardware partners, the UWD version of the Killer Control Center does not start automatically. 

Technically, it doesn't need to start automatically in order for our software to do its job. The Killer Control Center is basically your user interface for the Killer Network Service. The Killer Network Service is what does all the work, reducing latency and prioritizing applications. Even if the Killer Control Center isn't starting with Windows, the Killer Network Service is. There is nothing wrong with leaving the Killer Control Center unloaded until you wish to use its interface, or change application priorities. However, if you would like to set the Killer Control Center to start automatically, you can do so by following these steps:

  1. ​​Right-click Start
  2. Click ​Run
  3. ​Type ​shell:startup​ and press Enter
  4. Move the Startup window to the right side of your screen
  5. Click Start
  6. Locate the Killer Control Center
  7. Click and drag the Killer Control Center icon over to the Startup window
  8. Right-click the Killer Control Center shortcut that you have created in the Startup window and click ​Properties
  9. Click the drop-down box beside "Run" and change it to ​Minimized
  10. Click Apply
  11. Click OK
  12. Close the Startup window

The Killer Control Center will now run at startup, in the background, on your next restart  If you have other applications loaded, it should run without stealing focus, but it will still load as a full-size window. You can switch to that window and click the X to minimize it to the tray, or you can leave it maximized in the background for quick access to its user interface. 

How to Update or Install The Killer Control Center

 

Updating or Installing The Killer Control Center

The Killer Control Center installers contain drivers for the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500. The Killer Control Center can be installed on any system with one, or multiples of these network adapters.

Only the non-UWD version of the Killer Control Center that is downloaded from our website is compatible with our Wireless-N adapters - the Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103.

 The Killer Control Center cannot be installed on machines with the E2100, Xeno Pro, 2100, M1, or K1. These are legacy devices that are no longer supported, and no longer receive driver updates. 

Click here to jump to troubleshooting steps.

The first step in updating or installing the Killer Control Center is download the correct installer package. There are currently two different Killer Control Center installers:

Choosing the Correct Installer

Those using a Killer Wireless-N adapter, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and any older build of Windows 10 prior to 1803 (April 2018 Update) should use our website installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64

Those using Windows 10 1803 (April 2018 Update) or later should use the UWD installer, as long as they are not using a Wireless-N adapter - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd

Please note that the UWD installer is fully compatible with the E2200, E2400, E2500, Killer Wireless-AC 1525, 1435, 1535, 1550, and 1550i adapters, as well as all of our forthcoming adapters in 2018 and beyond.

Wireless xTend, a new feature of ours, is only compatible with the 1550, and will only appear if you use the UWD installer and have a 1550 installed.

If you are using Windows 10, and you are unsure which version you are running, you can find out by clicking Start, then typing winver and pressing Enter. A box will appear, which will give you information about Windows, including the version number. 

For more details on the differences between the two packages, please see this article - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/100-which-killer-control-center-should-i-install

Once you know which version to download, and have downloaded it, double-click the installer to install both the latest drivers for your Killer devices, and the latest version of the Killer Control Center. 

If all goes well, you can stop here. 

Errors or Other Issues When Installing

If you encounter any errors or problems when installing, first try uninstalling all versions of the Killer Software that are currently on your machine. We have developed a tool to make this very simple. Please follow the steps below:

  1. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe (please note that this is not the old Killer Remover tool - this is much more comprehensive)
  2. Make sure you have the installer for the Killer Control Center that you will be installing. Return here if you aren't sure. 
  3. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. There are two buttons - one for scanning, one for uninstalling. You do not have to scan. The scan might not find any software installations, but there may still be services installed on your machine that are preventing the installation of the current suite. Regardless of what the scan says, if you are having issues installing, make sure you click Remove Killer Software. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED"
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has completed restarting, run the installer for the Killer Control Center. 

If you are still unable to install the Killer Control Center, please try using Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed. You can find our guide for using this tool here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/90-microsoft-tool. This tool is very effective because, if you are still having problems by this point, the issue is very likely caused by files that have been shuffled around during a Windows Update. 

If the Microsoft Tool does not solve the issue, please submit a ticket to our support, along with an install log for us to analyze, by following these steps:

  1. Run the installer for the Killer Control Center one more time, so as to create the most recent possible information in the install log.
  2. After the installer fails, access your TEMP folder by clicking Start, then typing %TEMP%, then pressing Enter.
  3. Arrange the files in that folder by "Date Modified" so that the most recently modified files are at the top.
  4. You will see many files. Find the most recent file that begins with MSI and ends with .LOG. Move or copy that file to a place you will remember.
  5. Click Support > Contact Support at the top of our website, and be sure to click the folder and attach that .LOG file. In your ticket, please also mention any errors that you might have seen when attempting to install the Killer Control Center. 

Which Killer Control Center Should I Install?

5.0 

Which Killer Control Center Should I Install?

Users may notice that we often host more than one version of the Killer Control Center available for download from our website. This article will summarize the difference between the versions available, and hopefully give the user an idea of which installer they should download and use. 

A note on the Killer Network Manager - The Killer Network Manager is our deprecated performance suite. It does not contain current drivers. Users are free to use the Killer Network Manager if they like, but, as it is no longer in development, the first step in troubleshooting should be to uninstall the Killer Network Manager and install the Killer Control Center.
A note on finding your Windows version number - You will see Windows version numbers referenced in the following information. You can find your Windows version by clicking Start, then type winver and press Enter. You will see a box with information about your Windows install, including the Version, which is probably 1709 or 1803, as of June 5 2018. 
A note on device compatibility  -  The E2100, 2100, K1, M1, and Xeno Pro are legacy devices, and no longer receive driver updates. They are not supported with either of these packages.

The current Killer Control Center versions are as follows, as of August 3, 2018:

Killer Software Package - for Windows 10 1803

Release Notes

Device Compatibility: Killer Ethernet E2200, E2205, E2400, E2500 / Killer Wireless-AC 1550, 1435, 1535, 1525 

OS Compatibility: Windows 10 Build 1803 April 2018 Update and Later Only

What is this? This version is a major update. This is our most recent release, which has been tested primarily with, and optimized for Windows 10 version 1803 (April 2018 Update). This package contains the latest drivers for all current Killer Networking devices, as well as the Killer Control Center performance suite. A Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is not required. The installer will first install device drivers, and then redirect to the Windows Store to install the Killer Control Center software. Please note that the version number listed here is the version of the installer. The version of the Killer Control Center that the Windows Store installs will be different. 

What's new from the previous release? A new, updated driver for the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, the debut release of Wireless xTend for Killer 1550, and many other minor enhancements that are too numerous to list. Wireless xTend for Killer 1550 allows owners of the Killer 1550 to turn their machines into wireless access points, xTending the range of the currently connected wireless network through their computer. 

Who should use this?  All currently supported Killer Networking adapter users who are using Windows 10 version 1803 (April 2018 Update), except those using Wireless-N adapters. Those using the Windows Insider Preview versions of Windows 10 are also encouraged to use this version, and provide us with any feedback, should you encounter any issues.

What if this will not install?  Click here for troubleshooting steps. If you are unable to install this version, please try installing version 1.5.1859 above after submitting your install log. It is important that you submit your install log before installing 1.5.1859, or the install log will reflect the results of that install instead of reflecting the results of your attempted install of the UWD version.

Special conditions for this release: This version will install on versions of Windows 10 that are older than version 1803 (April 2018 Update), but many things will not function well. We highly recommend installing this version only on Windows 10 version 1803. 

 

Killer Control Center 64-bit
Release Notes

Device Compatibility: Killer Ethernet E2200, E2205, E2400, E2500 / Killer Wireless-AC 1550, 1435, 1535, 1525 / Killer Wireless-N 1102,1103,1202

OS Compatibility: Windows 10 (all builds), Windows 8.1, Windows 7

What is this? This is our previous release, which was well tested and troublefree on Windows builds 1709 (Fall Creator's Update) and 1803 (April 2018 Update). This package contains the latest drivers for all Killer Networking devices, except for the Killer Wireless-AC 1550, as well as the Killer Control Center performance suite. The included driver for the Killer Wireless-AC 1550 is not known to be problematic, but our other package includes a more recent driver for this device. 

What's new from the previous release? A new, updated driver for the Killer Wireless-AC 1550. 

Who should use this?  All Killer Network adapter owners who are using Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, as well as those using Windows 10, who have not yet updated to Version 1803 (Windows Spring Update), or who would prefer to not install the Killer Control Center through the Windows Store. Also, any Killer Wireless-N network adapter users. 

What if this will not install? Click here for troubleshooting steps

Special conditions for this release: Unlike the other package, this release uses a regular installer, and does not go through the Windows Store.

 

Errors When Installing

There have been many reports of issues with the Killer Control Center which can be resolved by performing a clean install of the Killer Control Center, as opposed to an update install, where the latest version is installed while an older version is in place. When troubleshooting, this is a good place to start. Here are the steps to perform a clean install of the Killer Control Center:

  1. Make sure you have the current installer handy to install. 
  2. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe
  3. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. It is not necessary to scan, and the scan may not find anything. Regardless, click Remove Killer Software, and give it some time to run. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED."
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has booted back up, access  your temporary files folder and delete the contents
    1. Click Start
    2. Type %temp% and press Enter. Your temp folder should open.
    3. Delete all files in the temp folder. These are all temporary install files, and are safe to delete. If you receive a prompt saying that a file cannot be deleted, you can safely select Skip All
    4. Close the temp folder
  7. Run the installer that you downloaded for the Killer Control Center. Follow the prompts to complete the installation. 
  8. Restart your machine if the installer requested a restart.
  9. Test to see if the issue is resolved.

If you are unable to resolve the issue with a clean install, please contact support so that we can help you out!

 

No Killer Network Interfaces Connected

 

A few things can cause the Killer Control Center to report error. Following are the most common, and how to correct the issue:

  • You are connecting to the Internet using a network adapter other than a Killer product. Some machines ship with network adapters from multiple vendors. For example, your machine may have a Killer Ethernet adapter, but the wireless adapter may be from a different manufacturer, such as Intel. The Killer Control Center will not work with another brand's networking adapter. Be sure that you are connecting to the Internet using the Killer network adapter. Our performance suites only work connected to the Internet with our products. If your Ethernet adapter is a Killer Networking adapter, and your wireless adapter is not, then you will need to use an Ethernet cable to use the Killer Control Center. You can check to see which adapters you have installed by right-clicking Start, then clicking Device Manager, then double-clicking Network Adapters. If the only Killer Network adapter is listed as an Ethernet adapter, then you will need to use an Ethernet cable to use the Killer Control Center.
  • You are using an older version of the Killer Control Center. Some recent versions of the Killer Control Center experienced issues identifying some adapters. This has been resolved in current versions of the suite. Updating to the latest suite should resolve the issue. Even if you have a new machine, the version of the software that was installed on it when it was boxed may now be out of date. You can find the latest Killer Control Center here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64.
  • You are not connected to the Internet. You will receive this error if you are not connected to the Internet using a Killer Networking adapter. Note that if you are connected to the Internet using a virtual adapter of any kind, even if that virtual adapter is attached to a Killer Networking adapter, the Killer Control Center will show this message as it cannot work with a virtual adapter. 
  • You recently installed or updated the Killer Control Center and have not rebooted your computer. Rebooting should resolve the issue. Please note that, to restart, you should click Start > Power > Restart, as simply closing the lid, or pressing the power button on many modern computers activates sleep mode, and does not actually power down the machine. 
  • You are using a virtual network adapter. The Killer Control Center can only work if you are connecting to the Internet using a Killer Networking Adapter. If you are connecting to the Internet using a virtual adapter, the Killer Control Center will not work, and will show this message instead. 

If you are seeing this message and none of the above applies, please try clean installing the Killer Control Center. You can find instructions for that here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/105-clean-install-the-killer-control-center

Error 1923 Verify That You Have Sufficient Privileges and Error 1939

4.8 

Error 1923 Verify That You Have Sufficient Privileges and Error 1939

Some users may encounter the error Error 1923: Verify that you have sufficient privileges to install system services and/or Error 1939 when they attempt to update or install the Killer Control Center. This is caused by the installer not being able to remove the previous version of the service. This appears to be due to the moving of files by the Spring 2018 Windows Features Update. There were also some updates that were incorrectly pushed through Windows Update that have resulted in the Killer Control Center being left in this state. In order to resolve this issue, you will need to uninstall the old version of the Killer Control Center, remove the service, and then run the installer again. We have developed a new tool, which will quickly and easily remove all old versions of our performance suite, as well as all old versions of our service from your system. 

A few notes about the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool:

  • This is not the Killer Remover tool that you might find elsewhere on the web and in this knowledge base. This is a brand new tool that we have just recently developed due to this issue. The old Killer Remover tool is not capable of resolving this issue, as it only targets pieces of installs that were broken by Windows Feature Updates prior to the 2017 Fall Creator's Update. 
  • This tool does not remove device drivers, other than what would normally be removed when running the uninstaller for the suite that you have currently installed. This tool primarily removes the Killer Performance Suite, and its attachments to Windows Update. 

Here are the steps to correct the Error 1923, Error 1939, or any other issue where Windows Update has put your machine in a state where you cannot install the Killer Control Center:

  1. Click here to download the latest Killer Control Center installer from our website. 
  2. Click here to download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool 
  3. Double-click the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool to run it.
  4. Click the Remove Killer Software button. This process may take some time.
  5. When the tool has finished removing everything, it will prompt you to restart your machine. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
  6. Double-click the Killer Control Center installer and follow the prompts to install. 

Please note - some machines will stil show pending Windows Updates with "Killer" and/or "Rivet" in them. Now that you have removed the previous install, and installed the website version, these updates now refer to software that is not present on your system. They should either attempt to install, fail, and no longer show as "pending," or simply be removed from the list of pending updates. If these updates cause issues after you have installed the Killer Control Center from our website, please let us know!

If you have any further issues, please feel free to contact support directly by clicking Contact Support under Support at the top of the page!

 

Killer Control Center High CPU Usage 

 

Killer Control Center High CPU Usage 

Some users have experienced high CPU usage by the Killer Control Center, often with the inability to update or effectively uninstall the Killer Control Center. This usually happens due to older versions of the software running on the latest version of Windows 10. 

First, if your machine is running very slowly due to the high CPU usage, you will want to disable the service. To do this:

  1. Click Start
  2. Type services.msc and press Enter
  3. Scroll until you find "Killer Network Service" or "Rivet Bandwidth Control." Once you find it, double click it.
  4. Click Stop. It may take a few moments for the service to stop. 
  5. Click OK and close the Services window. 

Your machine should now be more reactive while you uninstall the old version of the suite, and reinstall the latest.

  1. If you are using Windows 10 and don't already know which build, find out which build of Windows that your machine is currently running. If your computer has completed the Windows 10 Spring 2018 update, you are running version 1803. Otherwise, or if you don't know, continue reading.
    1. Click Start
    2. Type winver and press Enter
    3. A box will appear with some information about Windows. There will be a 'Version" number. It will probably be either 1709 or 1803. 
  2. Download the correct installer for your version of Windows.
    1. Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 Version 1709 and below, as well as those using Wireless-N adapters, should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64
    2. Windows 10 Version 1803 and above should download this installer - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/kcc-uwd
  3. Download the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool - https://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerSoftwareUninstaller.exe
  4. Run the Killer Software Uninstaller Tool. It is not necessary to scan, and the scan may not find anything. Regardless, click Remove Killer Software, and give it some time to run. When it is finished, it will say "RESTART REQUIRED."
  5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  6. Once your machine has booted back up, access  your temporary files folder and delete the contents
    1. Click Start
    2. Type %temp% and press Enter. Your temp folder should open.
    3. Delete all files in the temp folder. These are all temporary install files, and are safe to delete. If you receive a prompt saying that a file cannot be deleted, you can safely select Skip All
    4. Close the temp folder
  7. Run the installer that you downloaded for the Killer Control Center. Follow the prompts to complete the installation. 
  8. Restart your machine if the installer requested a restart.
  9. Test to see if the issue is resolved.

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

4.3 

Ethernet Link Speed Capped at 100 Mbps

You may find that your Ethernet speed is capped at 100 Mbps when your Internet Service Provider, or your internal network connection, should be providing speeds greater than 100 Mbps. If this is the case, you may be encountering a link speed issue. To check for this, check the link speed on the machine in question by following these steps:

  • Search Control Panel with Windows Search and press Enter
  • Click Network and Internet
  • Click View network status and tasks which will be underneath Network and Sharing Center
  • Click the connection that represents the Ethernet connection to your router or modem. You should see a screen that looks something like this.

link speed

Notice that the link "Speed" here reads as 100 Mbps. This means that the negotiated connection speed between the Ethernet adapter and whatever device it is plugged into is 100 Mbps. When everything is working correctly, this speed will read as 1.0 Gbps.

The only setting that is of concern for a Gigabit connection is that the adapter is set to Auto-Negotiate. From the Device Manager, you can check to see that the Killer adapter is set on Auto-Negotiate. This option is under the Advanced tab of the adapter's properties, in Speed & Duplex - right-click the adapter and choose properties, click the Advanced tab, and click Speed & Duplex, and make sure it is set to Auto-Negotiate. This is the default setting. We have had reports of some ISP technicians telling their customers that a Gigabit option will appear in this setting if the network adapter is working correctly. This is incorrect. Auto-Negotiate is the correct setting for Gigabit speeds in Speed & Duplex for Killer Networking Adapters.

If this is set correctly and your link speed still reads as 100 Mbps, then the issue could be a few things, although it is important to note up front that this is almost always an issue with an Ethernet cable.

Before troubleshooting any further, check the connection of the Ethernet cable into every piece of networking equipment, as well as your computer. Make sure each cable is labeled Cat 6 or Cat7. Unplug each Ethernet cable and plug it back in. Make sure that your cable is pressed firmly into the Ethernet jack. You should hear and feel a very audible click sound when the cable is in place. If you do not feel and hear this, then this cable should be considered broken, and you need to replace it. 

Even if you firmly believe that your Ethernet cabling is perfectly fine, and even if this cabling worked fine before, swapping it out for another, proven cable, or a brand new Cat 6 cable, will almost certainly solve the issue with the minimum of troubleshooting and headache. This is a very, very common occurrence when troubleshooting Gigabit Ethernet, and it nearly always comes down to one cable being the culprit. Note that this includes all cabling between the machine and the router, including any cabling in before and after any switches, or on the other side of any wall jacks, and behind the wall. However, if you were getting Gigabit using a particular setup and suddenly, with no changes whatsoever, your link speed is now 100 Mbps, then it's probably only one cable that is now having issues, and it is likely one that is exposed.

The fastest way to rule out any problems with anything other than cabling is to connect your machine directly into your modem with a single, proven Cat 6 or better Ethernet cable, and preferably into a proven Gigabit capable port, then check the link speed. If the link speed shows as 1.0 Gbps, then you know that the problem is somewhere in what you have just bypassed. Using this method of troubleshooting can be a pain if you are not dealing with a laptop, but it might still be worth doing if you have to decide if you need to call a contractor out to look at wiring behind your walls. Note that very long Ethernet cords are available for purchase, with lengths of over 200 feet or 60 meters, are available, so if you are involved in a prolonged debate with a technician over link speeds, this might be the simplest way to provide a temporary, single cable connection from your machine to the modem. 

That said, all adapters are different and handle shorts or issues with cables or ports differently, but a Gigabit adapter reporting as 100 Mbps is almost certainly a physical issue with the networking equipment.

You can troubleshoot this by trying different combinations:

  • If you cannot connect your machine to the modem with a single, proven Cat 6 cable, maybe you can connect a machine whose link speed currently shows as 1 Gbps to the Ethernet cable that is currently plugged into the problem machine. If this second machine now shows a link speed of 100 Mbps, this also proves that the issue is somewhere in the cabling or equipment between the machine and the access point, not with the machine itself. 
  • Power cycle (unplug and plug back in) your access point (hub, switch, router) and any other device between your machine and the access point.
  • Cat 6 is preferred to Cat 5e as, although the latter is technically capable of gigabit connections, it lacks any redundancies in grounding, which is an extremely common point of failure in network cables. Cat 6 remedies this issue, and making sure that all of your cabling is Cat 6 or better is usually a surefire way to achieve a gigabit connection. 
  • A "failed" Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable will usually still work at 100 Mbps. It doesn't take much physical trauma for a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps, and many of the cheaper ones don't support 1 Gbps out of the bag, even though they will be labeled as supported 1 Gbps connections. If you have only tried a Cat 5e cable, you owe it to yourself to try a Cat 6 cable. This is almost certainly the issue. If you are having issues achieving Gigabit speeds and you have Cat 5e cables in the mix then it is safe to assume that those specific Cat 5e cables are not Gigabit capable. This is common. Incidents such as rolling over the cable with an office chair, or stepping on it, or closing a door on it, can all cause a Cat 5e cable to revert to 100 Mbps link speeds when it was previously working at Gigabit speeds.
  • Try different ports on your access point (hub, switch, router). If possible, use a port that is proven capable of working at Gigabit speeds with another machine. 
  • If all of these fail, then likely the Ethernet connector on the mainboard has an issue and you would need to check with your PC manufacturer (or mainboard manufacturer, if you assembled the machine yourself) on what your warranty or RMA options are. You may want to perform a physical inspection on the Ethernet jack's pins to make sure that none of them are bent or otherwise damaged. It is worth stressing once more, though, that this issue is nearly always one with the cabling somewhere between the Ethernet jack on your machine, and the Ethernet jack for the modem.

E2100, 2100, Xeno Pro, K1, and M1 (Legacy Devices)

5.0 

The E2100, 2100, and Xeno Pro are legacy devices, and no longer receive updated device drivers. Please contact the manufacturer of your Killer 2100, Killer E2100, or Xeno Pro for the latest drivers. The same driver (either 32bit or 64bit) works for each product. It has been confirmed that the latest drivers for Killer 2100, Killer E2100, or Xeno Pro can be downloaded on VisionTek’s support page at: https://www.visiontek.com/support/download-drivers.html. If you are using Windows 10, and Windows does not automatically install drivers for the device, the Windows 8.1 drivers should work for your application.

There is no Windows 10 driver for the E2100, 2100 and Xeno Pro, and there will be no further driver development.

Support is no longer available for the Killer M1 and Killer K1. 

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.