Internet Problems With New Computers

 

Internet Problems With New Computers

This article only applies to brand new computers using Windows 10.

Some users may experience issues with brand new computers with Killer Network adapters and the Killer Control Center or Killer Network Manager preinstalled. 

These issues are often caused by Windows automatically updating to the latest version of the operating system without giving the user the chance to update any preinstalled software or device drivers. This results in software, which was likely up to date at the time the machine was boxed by the manufacturer, running on a version of the operating system on which it was never tested, and may not be able to operate on correctly.

If the user notices that, after Windows has updated, their Internet performance is severely degraded, or they see bluescreen errors that are attributed to our software or drivers, they should follow these steps:

  1. Right-click Start
  2. Click Apps and Features
  3. Find "Killer Performance Driver Suite" or any variation or variations, and uninstall it or them, restarting when required. 
  4. If a restart was not requested, restart your machine now by clicking Start > Power > Restart. Avoid using the power button on your computer, as it is likely mapped to sleep the machine, which will not work for this purpose.
  5. Windows 10 will install a basic set of drivers. This does not include any of the latency reducing and bandwidth prioritizing features of your Killer networking adapter, but it will serve to let you update everything. The only exceptions are the Killer Wireless-AC 1535 and the Killer Wireless-AC 1550.
    1. There may not be a built-in driver in Windows 10 for the 1535 if the machine is still on the original release build of Windows 10 when the user uninstalls the Killer Control Center. This is unlikely, as you will likely not have access to uninstall anything before Windows has updated itself well beyond this point. 
    2. The Killer Wireless-AC 1550 was released in 2018 and, as such, no version of Windows 10 previous to this time will have built-in drivers. 
  6. Make sure your BIOS and chipset drivers, at least, are up to date from your machine manufacturer's support site. 
  7. Make sure Windows 10 is fully up to date. To do this:
    1. Click Start
    2. Type Windows Update and press Enter
    3. Click Check for Updates
    4. Let your computer install whatever updates it finds. 
    5. Once it is finished, restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart, even if it has not asked you to do so.
    6. Repeat steps A through E until your machine finds no updates just after restarting.
  8. Download the latest Killer Control Center package, which also contains the latest drivers for your Killer network adapters - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64 - and double-click to install. 
  9. If you notice any issues with your Bluetooth, and you have a Killer Wireless adapter (Killer 1435, 1535, 1525, 1550) download and install the latest Bluetooth driver from our website - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/bluetooth.
  10. If your wireless access point (router or modem) seems to struggle with a new Killer Wireless adapter, either slowing down, restarting, or freezing, please first try unplugging the access point and plugging it back in. If that does not resolve the issue, the device likely needs a firmware update. For a wireless router that you own, please see the support for our specific device. For a wireless modem that is owned by your ISP, please contact your ISP and request that they update the firmware on your modem. 
  11. If you have a wireless router that continues to reset when the 1535 connects to it, even after you have updated the firmware, please see this article - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/35-router-issues-with-1535.

If you encounter any issues with your Killer adapters, please do not hesitate to contact us directly!

 

Wi-Fi or Bluetooth Missing

4.3 

Bluetooth or Wi-Fi Missing

Note: This guide can be used in the event of any M.2 device vanishing from the Device Manager. The procedure lists Killer devices specifically, but the phenomenon is widespread among M.2 devices and Windows 10, and these same steps can be used to restore functionality when any M.2 device disappears from Device Manager.

When this occurs, it is an issue of the BIOS or the operating system not enumerating the device properly. In very rare situations, it can be cause by some kind of physical trauma causing the device to become dislodged, or the device failing, but more often than not, the hardware is just fine. It’s just a matter of getting Windows or, sometimes, the BIOS, to see it again. Sometimes the device will be missing altogether, or sometimes it will be grayed out - the difference is only in whether your Device Manager is set to show devices that are no longer present in the machine. Either way, the Device Manager thinks that the device is gone, and that is what needs to be addressed.

  • First off, make sure that you do not have any USB devices disabled. The internal Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapter is actually USB device, so if there are any USB devices disabled in your Device Manager, for any reason, this can cause the Bluetooth device to vanish. If you are unable to enable the USB device, then you should resolve that issue first. This includes USB Hub devices, or any devices under the Universal Serial Bus controllers category in Device Manager that show any errors, for any reason. Once you no longer have any disabled USB devices, the Bluetooth device should show back up. On some platforms, this is the #1 cause of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adapters mysteriously vanishing from the Device Manager. Once you have resolved the USB issue, restart your machine, and check to see if the missing device has reappeared in your Device Manager. 

USB Error

  • If you do not have any disabled USB devices, or any with errors, or if you have resolved that issue and the Wi-Fi or Bluetooth adapter has not reappeared in the Device Manager, then you will need to update your chipset drivers, and possibly your machine or mainboard’s BIOS. We have noted that some platforms have chipset drivers that are buggy enough that they absolutely will experience this issue if their chipset drivers are not updated. You will need to obtain these drivers from your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support download page. You can usually find this page by going to the main website for your machine or mainboard manufacturer and looking under "Support", or by using your preferred search engine to search for your specific model, then selecting the result that leads to your machine or mainboard manufacturer's website. Once you have found the support downloads page, if you cannot tell which drivers are the chipset drivers, it is generally recommended that you simply update all of the offered drivers, except for the Killer Network card drivers, which you should get from us, as they are likely more recent. If there is a BIOS update available, then updating the BIOS is also recommended, especially if the BIOS update notes mention anything that might pertain to this situation. Make certain that you at least update the chipset and USB drivers, if applicable. Some platforms combine the USB drivers into the chipset drivers, so you may not see a separate download. Once you have done these updates, restart the machine, and see if the missing device reappears in the Device Manager.
  • Depending on what is available, the best order in which to update is as follows:
    1. Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    2. Update your chipset drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page. 
    3. Update the USB drivers from your machine or mainboard's support page.  If none are listed, they are probably rolled into the chipset driver. 
    4. Update all other drivers available from your machine or mainboard's support page, except Killer Networking and Bluetooth drivers, which you should get from us.
    5. Restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart
  • Windows itself can also play a part in the disappearing device. The Anniversary Update saw many such devices vanish, so much so that the Creator’s Update added a Bluetooth troubleshooter to Windows 10. Make sure that your Windows installation is up to date by using Windows Search to search Windows Update

    windows update

    then press Enter, and click Check for Updates

  • Once it has downloaded and installed everything it finds, restart the machine, and repeat this process until Windows Update finds no updates directly after restarting. Once this happens, check to see if the device has reappeared in the Device Manager. If this doesn’t help, and the issue is Bluetooth related, you can try troubleshooting using Windows built-in troubleshooter. Microsoft has instructions here - https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14169/windows-10-fix-bluetooth-problems-faq
  • If the device is still missing from the Device Manager, then that means that it isn’t the chipset drivers (or at least it isn’t only the chipset drivers) that is not properly enumerating the device, but rather the BIOS itself. In this case, you will need to discharge the machine to force the BIOS to re-enumerate all of its hardware (instructions below). Before you do this, make sure that you have updated the BIOS to the latest version, from the mainboard or machine manufacturer’s website, so that you address the flaw that caused this issue in the first place. Once that BIOS update is in place, and you have confirmed that the machine has booted back up, but the device is still not appearing in Device Manager, shut the machine back down, and unplug it from the wall. You will now need to fully discharge the machine.
    • If this is a desktop, you will need to remove the side panel, discharge yourself of static electricity on something metal (your computer’s case might work, or possibly your desk) and look for the CMOS battery. It is a large coin-cell battery. Remove that battery. Sometimes it’s easier with a flathead screwdriver, but it should be fairly simple to remove. Once you have removed that battery, press the power button on the machine 2-3 times to completely discharge it, then replace the CMOS battery and the case. If you are not comfortable doing this on your own, please refer to your mainboard or machine's support. 
    • If this is a laptop, hopefully it is one where you can easily remove the battery. This will be specific to your model of laptop, so you may need to refer to your owner’s manual, or your laptop’s support website. Some MSI models are held in with a single screw. If you are able to remove the laptop battery, do so, and then press the laptop’s power button a few times to fully discharge it.
    • If this is a laptop, but you are unable to remove the battery, or would prefer not to, you can discharge the machine through usage, instead. Unplug the laptop from the electric outlet, and temporarily change the power plan to a setting that does not allow it to sleep when the battery is low, then run the laptop until it discharges itself and will no longer power on. Once it has discharged itself, press the power button a few times to make sure it is fully discharged.
    • Once you have a fully discharged machine, put it back together, plug it back in, and let it boot in to Windows. You may see a message mentioning setting the BIOS to defaults, or something along those lines. This is nothing to be alarmed about – simply confirm that you want it set to defaults, unless you had set custom settings, in which case, you will need to re-set those custom settings. In the future, this message may be a warning that your CMOS or laptop battery is dead or on its last legs, but for now, we know that you discharged the machine on purpose, so we can safely ignore this warning. Once you are booted back in to Windows, check the Device Manager to make sure that the missing Wi-Fi or Bluetooth device is no longer missing.
  • In some very rare cases, the device may not show up because the machine was not fully discharged. We have had users report that they were able to repeat the steps to discharge their machines a second time, and have had success after that. Once the updates were in place, and the devices shows up, that is usually the end of the problem.

One final step that you can take, if you are willing and able to do so, is to physically reseat your Wi-Fi adapter. The Wi-Fi and Bluetooth device are on the same card, so there is only one adapter to reseat, and reseating this adapter only requires that you remove one screw, slide it out of the slot, then slide it back in and screw it back down, being careful not to dislodge or damage the attached antenna leads. However, the difficulty in getting to this adapter and performing this step will vary depending on your machine or mainboard, and your level of expertise. You may wish to consult with your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support at this point. If you have followed all of the other steps, and the device still has not reappeared, the device, or the mainboard, may also be physically damaged, and in need of repair, which would also necessitate contacting your mainboard or machine manufacturer’s support for RMA or repair options.  

Wi-Fi Adapter Disabling

 

There are a few things that can cause your Wi-Fi adapter to disable itself, but, unfortunately they don't really make themselves known up front. Here are some steps you can try to correct the issue:

If you have done all of the above, but still find that your Wi-Fi adapter is disabling itself, please contact us directly so that we may assist you further!

Issues When Updating or Installing Killer Control Center

 

Issues When Updating or Installing Killer Control Center

Users may encounter errors when installing or updating the Killer Control Center. 

If you encounter any problems, please select from the following options:

 

 

The Killer Control Center Cannot Automatically Update

 If the installer cannot automatically update, you might see an error, such as, but not limited to, this one:

Killer Performance Driver Suite Cannot Be Installed With

In this case, you will need to manually uninstall the previous versions. First, however, you will want to download the latest installer and have it handy. Once you have the installer ready to go, right-click Start, click Apps and Features, then find every entry that has "Killer" in it, including "Killer Drivers" and/or "Killer Performance Suite, or any variation, and uninstall them. After they have uninstalled, restart your machine, then install the latest suite.

 

Previous Killer Applications or Drivers Cannot Be Uninstalled
OR
There Are No Killer Applications or Drivers in The Apps and Features Menu But the Killer Control Center Will Not Install

If you encounter an issue where the old "Killer Suite" or "Killer Drivers" cannot be uninstalled, and they remain stuck in your Apps and Features menu, or they appear to be removed, but the latest Killer Control Center appears to attempt to install, then roll back, then there are a few ways to address this. Even if you can no longer see the old applications in your Apps and Features menu, it is very likely that they are still there, and that they are the problem. For very old previous installs, especially those that may be broken by updates from Windows 7 to Windows 10, we have developed a tool that can remove the old installs. Here is a step-by-step guide on downloading and using the tool. Use this as your first step in troubleshooting a broken older install:

  1. Download the Killer Remover from here - http://www.killernetworking.com/support/KillerRemover_v1.0.0.1.exe
  2. Right-click Start and click Apps and Features.
  3. Uninstall all "Killer" suites and drivers that will uninstall from this menu. 
  4. Close the Apps and Features menu and double-click the Killer Remover.
  5. Once it is finished, it will prompt you to restart your machine. Restart your machine, and check to see if the stuck item is removed from the Apps and Features menu

 

The Application is Still Stuck or The Latest Package Still Cannot Install After I Have Run the Killer Remover

The Microsoft Installer is probably encountering an error from which it cannot recover. Sometimes, you will get an error, such as "The feature you are trying to use is on a network resource that is unavailable..." or some other seemingly unrelated error, or the installer may fail with no error given other than it could not complete. Luckily, Microsoft has a tool to fix this issue, and you can find our detailed, step-by-step guide on how to find and use Microsoft's tool for fixing problems that block programs from being installed or removed- http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/34-error-2753-xtendsoftapservice. Make sure you choose "Uninstalling" even if you are trying to ultimately install the latest suite, as the problem is that you need to remove the remaining parts of the old software, even if they do not appear in  your Apps and Features menu. 

If you still have issues with the Killer Control Center's installer, or uninstalling older versions of the suites, please contact support, and we will be happy to help. If the installer is failing, please run the installer one more time, and include the log that is generated in your temp folder. You can access your temp folder by pressing Windows Key + R, typing %TEMP%...

 

winkey r temp

...and pressing Enter.

From there, sort by Date, and attach the most recent MSI***.LOG to your support request. It should be dated at the time you last ran the installer.

msilog

You can reach support by clicking below. Please also include information on any troubleshooting that you have already done.

Slow Network Speeds

5.0 

Slow Network Speeds

If you are experiencing slow Internet or network speeds, you can follow this troubleshooting guide to address and correct the most common problems. 

If you haven't already, please try installing the latest Killer Control Center from our website, and only from our website. It includes many fixes and improvements that are not be included in other packages. If you are still using the Killer Network Manager, you'll want to download the Killer Control Center, and then manually uninstall the Killer Network Manager, as well as the "Killer Drivers" entry in your programs list. You can find the latest Killer Control Center here: http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. Please download and run this installer, which will also install the latest drivers. If you experience any problems installing the Killer Control Center, you can refer to this article for help - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software 

Once you have successfully updated your drivers, you will want to restart your computer by clicking Start > Power > Restart. It is important to note that closing the lid or pressing the power button on many modern computers does not shut them down, but instead activates sleep mode. You must restart them by clicking Start > Power > Restart for them to restart.

If updating the drivers does not solve the issue, try resetting your networking equipment in this specific order, even if you have reset your some or all of your equipment previously. This order is proven to help your devices sync up properly, and will help to get a clean slate with further troubleshooting. Doing this can help even if only one device is experiencing problems. 

  1. Shut down your computer.
  2. Locate your modem and note the lights on your modem when it is normal and ready. There may be a "Ready" light.
  3. Unplug your modem, router, and any switches or hubs, between your computer and the modem, as well as any wireless boosters or access points, and leave them all unplugged for now.
  4. Plug in your modem.
  5. Wait until your modem's lights show normal operation again.
  6. Plug in your router, if you have one, and give it about five minutes to boot.
  7. Plug in anything else between your computer and the modem
  8. Power on your computer.
  9. Once your computer is booted and connected to the Internet, you will want to reset its network stack:
    1. In the search box on the taskbar, type Command prompt, right-click Command prompt, and then select Run as administrator > Yes.
    2. At the command prompt, run the following commands in the listed order, and then check to see if that fixes your connection problem:
      • Type netsh winsock reset and press Enter.
      • Type netsh int ip reset and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /release and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /renew and press Enter.
      • Type ipconfig /flushdns and press Enter.
  10. Now reboot your machine once more and test to see if the issue is resolved.

If not, the next step is to make sure that your Windows installation is completely up to date. Microsoft has been updating Windows more often than with any previous release, so it's important to keep things up to date. To do this, simply search Windows Updates, hit Enter, and then click Check for Updates. If your machine finds updates, check again once it finishes installing. Once your machine finds no updates, restart again, and then check for updates once more. Once your machine finds no updates upon a fresh reboot, your Windows installation should be fully up to date.

If you have performed the above, and you are still experiencing issues with slow network speeds, there are some other things to try:

  • Set a benchmark. Place the device in one place, if dealing with Wi-Fi, and run a test using one speed test. Turn off all other network usage while troubleshooting. Speedtest.net and Testmy.net are both good bandwidth tests. Run three tests in short succession and record an average as your starting point. Test after each change to see if there has been improvement. Record what you changed, and what the speeds the change produced. If the change seems dramatic, restart the machine and test again to be sure. 
  • Make sure your BIOS is up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Make sure your chipset drivers are up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Make sure all of the other drivers are up to date from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page. You can safely download and install all available driver packages. If the driver does not apply, it will either not install, or will not be used. If the only options in a driver installer package are "Repair" or "Uninstall", choosing "Repair" will update the driver, if there is a newer driver available.
  • Update the firmware on your router if you own the router.
  • Update the firmware on your modem if you own the modem, but only if your ISP accepts the firmware. Your ISP's support team can help you with this. Some ISPs also have this information listed somewhere, but they may need to do something on their end if you update the firmware, in order to re-authorize your modem. 
  • Have your ISP update the firmware on your modem or router if they own your modem or router.
  • If you are using Wi-Fi, minimize the number of solid objects between the access point's antenna and the device suffering from low speeds, using line-of-sight. Moving a device or antenna even an inch to one side could bypass multiple solid objects, making an enormous difference. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi, use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi analyzer to make changes to your router's settings. 
    • 5 GHz routers should be set to channels 36-48, and/or 149-165 that are as far away from other channels as possible.
    • 2.4 GHz routers should be set to channels 1, 6, or 11, depending on which channels have the least powerful conflicting radios present.
    • Sideband, or side channel should be set to 20 MHz if there are many other Wi-Fi access points in your area, especially if you are forced to share a channel. Higher side channels are less powerful, but provide a wider band, allowing the signal to get around solid objects better, theoretically improving performance in situations where there are no interference concerns, but the Wi-Fi signal needs to "get around" solid objects. Many, however, report that, in real life testing, 20 MHz still provides the better signal, so your mileage may vary. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi and your router has both a 5 GHz radio and a 2.4 GHz radio, name them something different. Although it might seem simpler to name them the same thing, many routers do not handle this very well, and you can see performance issues by having them named the same thing. Many people opt to simply add "5" to the end of the 5 GHz radio. 
  • If you are using Wi-Fi extenders, name each of your extenders something different, so that you know which access point you are connected to. Wi-Fi extenders have limited radio capacity, and will, always provide at least slightly slower speeds than connecting directly to the router, as they have to use the same radio to receive and transmit, at the same time. 
  • If it seems like other machines using the same access point are having no issues, try to verify this. Borrow their machine and run a speed test. Ask for permission first, of course. If you are experiencing issues on a public access point, you might just find that the public access point is just terrible, and that no one else is having a problem because you're the only one playing latency-intensive first person shooters. 
  • If you are using a Wireless-N router in a crowded Wi-Fi environment, you are very likely to encounter drops and speed issues no matter what settings you change. Unfortunately, the 2.4 GHz spectrum is very limited on how many channels are available, and conflicts arise quickly. Updating to a Wireless-AC router may be required to increase your speeds and reduce wireless drops. 
  • If you are using an antivirus or firewall application, try completely uninstalling it for testing purposes. Unfortunately, simply disabling these programs do not work for troubleshooting purposes, as they often continue to manipulate network traffic. They must be fully uninstalled. If you notice that your speeds increase dramatically with the antivirus or firewall application uninstalled, try installing a freshly downloaded version from their website. If that doesn't help, then the issue may be one with the antivirus application itself. In that case, you will want to contact the support team for the antivirus application. 

If you are unable to get your speed issues sorted out using the above tips, feel free to contact us directly using the information below! 

 

How to Update or Install The Killer Control Center

2.5 

Updating or Installing The Killer Control Center

You can find the latest Killer Control Center, as well as the latest drivers for your Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500, here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64.

The installer will automatically detect and install on any 64-bit version of Windows 7, 8.1, and Windows 10.

If you are using an older version of our suite, such as the Killer Network Manager, or you have not updated your network adapter drivers since your last Windows feature update (for example: Anniversary Update, Creator’s Update), then we suggest downloading the Killer Control Center, but uninstalling any application with the "Killer" name from your Apps and Features menu (accessible by right-clicking Start) and restarting your machine before installing the Killer Control Center.

 

How to Update or Install The Killer Network Manager

4.0 

Updating or Installing The Killer Network Manager

The Killer Network Manager is our outgoing performance suite. It is no longer being updated, and does not contain the latest Ethernet or Wi-Fi drivers. We encourage all users of the Killer Wireless-AC 1525/1535/1435, Killer Wireless-N 1202/1103, Killer E2200, Killer E2400, and Killer E2500 to upgrade to the Killer Control Center, found here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. This includes users whose machines came with the Killer Network Manager preinstalled. There is no need to continue using the Killer Network Manager. 

For a smooth installation, download the latest Killer Control Center installation package, then uninstall all Killer products from your Apps and Features menu, which is accessible by right-clicking Start, then restart your computer, and double-click the new installation package to install the new Killer Control Center.

The old Killer Network Manager suite is still available for download here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/e2200-e2400-wireless - but will no longer be updated, and may not be fully compatible with future Windows updates, antivirus suites, or other applications that manipulate network data. 

Bluetooth Issues

 

Some users may experience issues with Bluetooth devices. These issues may include, but are not limited to:

  • Unable to discover any devices
  • Unable to discover the devices you wish to use
  • Unable to pair with devices
  • Devices pair but do not work correctly
  • Devices pair and work correctly but intermittently
  • Devices pair and work correctly but disconnect intermittently

The first thing to do is to make sure you have the latest Bluetooth driver installed. Bluetooth drivers for Killer devices are not included in any other package, and must be downloaded and installed separately. They can be found here - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/bluetooth. Once you have run the installer for the Bluetooth driver, check to make sure that the latest driver has been installed. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Right-click Start
  2. Click Device Manager
  3. Double-click Bluetooth
  4. Locate your Bluetooth adapter, which should be labeled Qualcomm (something something) Bluetooth 4.1. See image below.



  5. Right-click on your Bluetooth adapter and click Properties, and click the Driver tab. Make sure that the number beside Driver Version corresponds with the current Driver Version listed in the Bluetooth download page for your device. See below image. Note that this image only highlights the location of the driver version number. Do not compare the number to this image - compare to the current version on the download page.

    Bluetooth Driver Version

  6. If the correct driver version number is not displayed, you may have to install the Bluetooth driver manually. Please see this guide - http://killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/49-installing-bluetooth-drivers-from-device-manager
  7. Once the Bluetooth driver is up to date, restart your machine by clicking Power > Start > Restart, then test to see if the issue is resolved.

If the issue is not resolved, then the problem could be due to a variety of causes. Found below are the most common fixes for Bluetooth problems, which we update regularly:

  • Update your BIOS from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Update your chipset driver from your machine or mainboard manufacturer's support page.
  • Update the drivers for any other device on your machine that uses any kind of wireless technology, as it may be interfering with your Bluetooth device. For example, if your machine is equipped with Thunderbolt 
  • If you have a dual-band Wi-Fi connection, use the 5 GHz connection instead of the 2.4 GHz connection. Bluetooth operates on the 2.4 GHz band, and 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi can cause interference with Bluetooth.
  • In your Wi-Fi router or modem's settings page, change the sideband or side channel of your 2.4 GHz radio to 20 MHz. This creates a tighter radio wave that is less likely to cause interference to other 2.4 GHz devices.
  • Change your Wi-Fi router or modem's 2.4 GHz channel. Try to stick to Channels 1, 11, or 6. Use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi Analyzer to see which channel has the least interference. If you are already on that channel, switch to the next least interference, and see if that improves your Bluetooth issues. 
  • If you have any USB wireless devices on connected to your machine, try unplugging them and see if that improves your Bluetooth issues. If it does, try moving the USB dongle to a different USB port, as far away from the original port as possible. 
  • Some monitors and LCD displays and televisions can cause interference with higher 2.4 GHz channels. If you are experiencing issues near such a device, try changing the 2.4 GHz channel on your wireless router to 1 or 6 to free up as much space as possible in the upper bands, to reduce interference. 
  • Poorly shielded cabling for external devices, especially high powered devices like hard drives or external media readers and writers, can cause radio interference. If the issue is especially prevalent when using such devices, try replacing the cables.  

There are many other things that can cause wireless interference. If you are experiencing otherwise unresolved Bluetooth issues, either try to avoid being physically near these potential contributors to interference, or take measures to increase and improve shielding, to decrease interference. 

  • Microwave ovens
  • Cabling and connectors for Direct Satellite Service (DSS) (If these are old, consider replacing them)
  • Poorly shielded power lines in the wall
  • 2.4 GHz cordless phones (these may have a channel switch on them - try changing it) 
  • Wireless RF security video recorders
  • Wireless speakers (for computer or otherwise)
  • Any other wireless device, such as microwave transmitters, wireless cameras, baby monitors, or even a neighbor's Wi-Fi device, if you live in close proximity, where their Wi-Fi device may be just on the other side of the wall, can potentially cause enough interference on the 2.4 GHz band to completely disable Bluetooth.

The Bluetooth standard is usually very good at finding a space in which to operate, regardless of interference, and the vast majority of the time, it does this without any user interaction. Unfortunately, though, sometimes there is just too much interference, or the interference unbalances the 2.4 GHz wavelength in such a way, that it is impossible to make a connection. You will never eliminate all sources of interference. There are just too many devices that are constantly bombarding the 2.4 GHz band, which is why the 5 GHz band was introduced for Wi-Fi. The goal in troubleshooting Bluetooth interference is to eliminate enough interference for the Bluetooth adapter to be able to find a spot with which to make a good connection. 

If you are unable to eliminate causes of Bluetooth interference, it is possible to increase shielding. Metal, concrete, and plaster are all very good at reflecting and/or absorbing radio waves, as is brick, to a lesser degree, so consider that when relocating your machine to move away from any interference. 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

 

Ad-Hoc and Hotspot Functionality with Killer Adapters in Windows 10

You may wish to create an Ad-Hoc or Hotspot network with your Killer Adapter on your Windows 10 machine.

With Windows 10, all Ad-Hoc and Hotspot functionality has been officially moved away from the drivers, and into the operating system itself.

If you would like to create a Hotspot or Ad-Hoc network with Windows 10, you simply need to click Start, type Hotspot, and press Enter. All of the relevant settings for your Hotspot network will be on that page.

Hotspot Settings
With Windows 10, this is the current official limit of Hotspot or Ad-Hoc functionality.

The Windows 10 version of our driver does not support the "Hosted Network" feature because Microsoft's own WDI driver does not have support for this. Microsoft is having all wireless vendors move to the WDI model, thus this feature will not work on Windows 10 drivers until after (and if) Microsoft expands support for SoftAP/Wi-Fi Direct.

In the meantime, if you need this feature back for certain older applications that made use of their own Hotspot or Ad-Hoc features, you can load the Windows 8.1 drivers via Device Manager from our INF download. We have verified that this works, and have had confirmation from other users as well.

http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

However, we cannot guarantee that Windows Update will not automatically update these drivers, or that they will work flawlessly with Windows 10, as they are, after all, Windows 8.1 drivers. Use Windows 8.1 drivers in Windows 10 at your own risk.

Windows Server Drivers

 

Windows Server Drivers

From time to time, we receive requests for Windows Server compatible drivers for our network adapters. Although we do not provide package installers for Windows Server editions, our drivers are Windows WHQL certified, and as such will work with recent Windows Server editions, so long as they are installed manually from the Device Manager using our .INF files.

You can download the .INF files from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-drivers-inf

If you need assistance manually installing the .INF files using Device Manager, you can follow our guide here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/10-installing-drivers-device-manager

The Killer Control Center is not availalbe on Windows Server editions. 

Avoiding Broken M.2 Antenna Connectors When Changing Adapters

 

M.2 WiFi modules and their connectors continue to get smaller as system providers continue to make thinner notebooks. This makes it much more difficult to disconnect the antenna lead from the module by hand when changing M.2 adapters. In order to properly disconnect the antenna from the module, all wireless module makers now recommend using a specially designed tool. For the Killer Wireless AC modules, we recommend using an IPEX MHF4L 90609-0001. This will greatly reduce the chance of damage to the wireless module connector or to the antenna connector. If you have further questions, please email us at killersupport@rivetnetworks.com.

Installing Bluetooth Drivers From Device Manager

 

In some cases, when there is no driver for your Bluetooth device, the Device Manager may mis-identify the Bluetooth device, or it may not identify it at all. In this case, you will need to install the Bluetooth driver from the Device Manager by following these steps:

  1. Run the installer but don't bother rebooting
  2. Verify that it created a folder called "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bluetooth Suite"
  3. In Device Manager, double-click the Bluetooth device, however it is currently named
  4. Under the Driver tab, click Update Driver
  5. Click Browse My Computer For Driver Software
  6. Click Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer
  7. Click Have Disk
  8. Browse to "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bluetooth Suite\driver"
  9. There should be only one option - atheros_bth.inf - click it and click Open
  10. Click Okay
  11. Select Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4 Bluetooth 4.1 and click Next
  12. Click Yes on the warning popup
  13. Reboot after it finishes the install
  14. After the reboot, check Device Manager to verify that your Bluetooth device is now named Qualcomm Atheros QCA61x4 Bluetooth 4.1 and you should be good to go!

The Killer 1535/1525/1435 in Ubuntu/Debian

2.1 

Installing The Killer 1535/1525/1435 in Ubuntu/Debian

Ubuntu/Debian 14.04

You will first need to install the latest backports package to have up to date drivers. 

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuBackports#Installing_Backports

Ubuntu/Debian 16.04

The built in drivers should work without any changes, though you may need to update your wireless firmware:

 

wget http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/main/l/linux-firmware/linux-firmware_1.170_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i linux-firmware*.deb
sudo modprobe -r ath10k_pci && sudo modprobe ath10k_pci

 

Installing Drivers From .INF Package Through Device Manager

4.5 

Installing Drivers Using Device Manager

If you would like to install the Killer E2200, Killer E2400, Killer Wireless-N, or Killer Wireless-AC drivers without the Killer Performance Suite - you can do so using these steps. Note that this will disable all network prioritization features.

  1. Download the latest .INF package from this location - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/category/other-downloads
  2. Extract the contens of the package to a location that you will remember.
  3. If you currently have the performance suite installed, you will want to uninstall it first by right-clicking Start, then clicking Apps and Features. Then uninstall all "Killer" labeled applications in this window, including anything labeled "suite" or "driver," and restart your machine by clicking Start > Power > Restart.
  4. Once your computer is ready, right-click Start, and click Device Manager.
  5. Locate the Killer Network Adapter in your Device Manager. If it has a driver already installed by Windows, it will be located by its name under Network Adapters. If it has no driver installed, it will be named Ethernet Controller or Unknown Device, as in the screenshot below.
  6. Right-click the adapter, and click Update Driver Software... or Update Driver, whichever is available. 
  7. Click Browse my computer for driver software. 



  8. Click Let me pick from a list of available drivers on my computer
  9. Click Have disk
  10. Click Browse
  11. Navigate to the location where you extracted the standalone driver package earlier. 
  12. From there, you will only have one option, which will be a folder called Production. Double-click that folder.
  13. Double-click your operating system.
  14. Double-click your network adapter. (Eth for all Ethernet Adapters, 11AC for all Wireless-AC adapters, 11N for all Wireless-N adapters)
  15. There will be only one file. Double-click it. 
  16. Click OK
  17. Select your exact model from the list and click Next

 

The final screen should show that you have successfully installed the driver. You can now click on Close.

 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

 

Verizon FIOS 5 GHz Issues

Users may encounter a situation where their Killer Wireless-AC adapter will not connect to their FIOS router on the 5 GHz Wi-Fi band. 

This seems to be due to the FIOS routers automatically choosing specific DFS channels that they may not fully support. There are a multitude of reports about this phenomenon around the web - where certain devices can connect to them while others cannot - but this post explains it fairly well - https://www.reddit.com/r/HomeNetworking/comments/2tu2so/why_some_devices_cant_see_the_verizon_fios_g1100s.

Fortunately, the fix is simple:

  1. Log in to your FIOS router's setup page. This page explains how to do so with some FIOS routers. It may not include all models. You may have to seek assistance from your ISP. https://www.howtogeek.com/197382/how-to-change-the-wi-fi-channel-on-your-verizon-fios-router/
  2. Change your router's 5 GHz channel. You can use the Killer Control Center's Wi-Fi analyzer to find which channel has the least traffic, but changing to any channel that is not a DFS channel should allow your devices to connect. Channels 36-48 and 149-165 are non-DFS channels in the United States. Your area may vary. You can reference this chart to find out which channels are DFS channels, and which are not, in your area of the world - - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels#5_GHz_(802.11a/h/j/n/ac/ax)
  3. Restart your machine, if necessary, and see if the issue is resolved. 

No Killer Enabled Devices On Linksys WRT32X

 

Users with Killer Network Adapters and the Linksys WRT32X may see "No Killer Enabled Devices" or "0 Killer Enabled Devices" on the user interface page of their WRT32X. 

The Killer optimization on the WRT32X is compatible with all Killer adapters that work with the Killer Control Center, which includes the:E2500, E2400, E2200, E2201, and all of our Wireless-N and Wireless-AC adapters. 

Please note that Windows 8.1 or 10 is required on the Killer enabled device for the router to label it as such in the router's interface. The router will still prioritize the Windows 7 Killer enabled device, but it will not appear that way in the router interface. 

You must also have a recent version of the Killer Control Center installed. You can find the latest version of the Killer Control Center here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you run into any problems updating your performance suite, you can refer to our installation troubleshooting KB here - http://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software.

After you have installed the latest Killer Control Center, if the router still fails to detect the Killer adapters, you may need to unplug the router for ten seconds, then plug it back in. If it still does not recognize the adapters. you may need to restart your computer once more by clicking Start > Power > Restart

If you still experience issues, it is recommended that you contact Linksys Support unless you are having other issues with your Killer adapter, in which case you should reach out to us through the contact form below. 

 

Wi-Fi Channels 12 and 13

3.0 

Some users have reported problems seeing Wi-Fi access points that are using channels 12 or 13. This is a driver issue that will be corrected in later versions. In the meantime, there is a fairly simple registry tweak, which you can perform, that will enable your machine to see these channels. Note that this method has only been tested in Windows 10. If you have success using this method in Windows 7 or 8.1, please reach out to us at the contact information below and let us know!

  1. Click Start
  2. Type regedit and press Enter
  3. Copy the following, and paste it into the bar beneath File, Edit, View, Favorite, Help: 

    Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
     
  4. Then press Enter. It should jump to a point in the registry that looks like the below picture.
    Registry
  5. Each numbered folder within corresponds with a device on your machine. Unfortunately, from here, it's complete guesswork as to which folder equals which device. Fortunately, it's pretty obvious as you click on each folder. For instance, 0006 is my Killer 1525, as you can see in screenshot. If in doubt, look for the "DriverDesc" entry. They're in alphabetical order. But, again, it should be pretty obvious. If you see it talking about Bluetooth, it's the wrong one. Once you find it, you know where the registry portion for your Killer adapter is hiding. 
  6. On the right pane of the registry editor, find the entry marked "AddNewChannelfor11d". This is our holy grail of channels 12 and 13. It is currently set to a value of 0. Double-click it. Change the value to 1, and click the OK button.
  7. Click File then Exit
  8. You have now activated the adapter's ability to see channels 12 and 13. 

What Is A "Killer Enabled Device?"

 

What Is A "Killer Enabled Device?"

A "Killer Enabled Device" is any computer that is connected to the Internet using a currently supported Killer Networking adapter. These adapters can be found installed in gaming laptops, desktops, and mainboards, manufactured by various well-known and respected names in the computer industry. If you are looking for a Killer Enabled Device, then you are looking for a machine, or motherboard, with one of these network adapters. Currently supported adapters include:

  • All Killer Wireless-N Wi-Fi adapters
  • All Killer Wireless-AC Wi-Fi adapters
  • Killer E2200, E2400, and E2500 Gigabit Ethernet Adapters

If you have such a device, and you are connected to a router, such as the WRT32X, and it is not recognizing your adapter as a Killer Enabled Device, then you may need to update your Killer Control Center. You can find the latest version of hte Killer Control Center here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/item/killer-control-center-x64. If you have any issues updating your suite, you can find troubleshooting steps here - https://www.killernetworking.com/driver-downloads/kb/faq/6-troubleshooting-killer-ethernet-wireless-drivers-software

Wi-Fi Disconnects and Latency on Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch

 

Wi-Fi Disconnects and Latency on Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch

Some users have noted Wi-Fi disconnects and latency on some distros of Linux after recent updates.

This issue likely affects Debian, Ubuntu, and Arch, and may also affect any other Debian-based distros such as Mint, Kali, etc. 

As the ath10k Wi-Fi driver that is used by our Wi-Fi devices in these versions of Linux is a community sourced driver, we have no direct impact on its stability, but since some users have indicated that they have found a fix for these issues, we wanted to share the fix with the rest of our users. 

In summary, the fix is to install the updated firmware and firmware repo, following these steps:

  1. Download https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin and overwrite /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin with the downloaded file.
  2. Download https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/4.4.1/firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1and overwrite /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin.
  3. Restart

Following is a much more detailed, step-by-step guide on how to implement this fix:

  1. Open a Terminal window and navigate to the following location:
    cd /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/
  2. Backup your board-2.bin and firmware-6.bin files:
    sudo mv /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin.bak
    sudo mv /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin /lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/firmware-6.bin.bak
  3. Download the two replacement versions and place them into the '/lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0/' folder:
    Download: https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/blob/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/board-2.bin
    Download: https://github.com/kvalo/ath10k-firmware/raw/master/QCA6174/hw3.0/4.4.1/firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1
  4. Rename your new 'firmware-6...' file to 'firmware-6.bin':
    sudo mv firmware-6.bin_WLAN.RM.4.4.1-00065-QCARMSWP-1 firmware-6.bin
  5. Enter ls -la into your terminal to verify the directory looks something like this:
    user@Ubuntu-XPS:/lib/firmware/ath10k/QCA6174/hw3.0$ ls -la
    total 3168
    drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Feb 6 15:29 .
    drwxr-xr-x 4 root root 4096 Jun 24 2016 ..
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 271412 Feb 6 15:30 board-2.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 271412 Feb 6 15:28 board-2.bin.bak
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 337204 Nov 15 15:56 board-2.bin.wifi-qca6174
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8124 May 12 2016 board.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 8124 Dec 1 2016 board.bin.wifi-qca6174
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 733784 Dec 1 2016 firmware-4.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 711408 Feb 6 15:30 firmware-6.bin
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 711408 Feb 6 15:28 firmware-6.bin.bak
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 79689 Dec 1 2016 notice_ath10k_firmware-4.txt
    -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 82663 Nov 15 15:44 notice_ath10k_firmware-6.txt
  6. Restart your computer.

Please let us know if you have any issues following this guide, or if you note any errors. You can reach at killersupport@rivetnetworks.com

Have a question about your Killer product that isn't answered in our Knowledge Base?  Contact Us.